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When Is the Digital in Architecture?
edited by Andrew Goodhouse

Contributions by Stan Allen, Phil Bernstein, Nathalie Bredella, Mario Carpo, Wolfgang Ernst, Marco Frascari, Peter Galison, Orit Halpern, Greg Lynn, Antoine Picon, Molly Wright Steenson, Bernard Tschumi, Mark Wigley, Andrew Witt

When is the digital in architecture? What are the conditions that led architects to integrate digital tools into their practices? Over the course of its research program Archaeology of the Digital, the CCA has collected the archival records of twenty-five projects realized between the late 1980s and the early 2000s in order to understand this period as a point of origin for the digital. But if we take care to identify the digital as a condition that is made possible by the conceptual foundations of digital media and not necessarily by digital media itself, the boundaries of the digital moment—when it began and under what circumstances—become less clear.

There are eight million stories of the origins of the digital in architecture, and this book brings together fourteen of them. The arguments address specific changes in ways of thinking about architecture, building, and cities, as well as the shifts in technology that resulted from these changes, marking both a capstone of Archaeology of the Digital and the start of an investigation into other beginnings of the digital in architecture.

But it’s not just about articulating a variety of responses. Asking a question like “When is the digital in architecture?” can produce millions of stories in response and millions of digressions and redirections that narrow in focus and change geographies, producing a Tristram Shandy of the digital as the CCA continues to build its digital archive and make it increasingly accessible to researchers. If this novel of digressions is distributed across future research projects and extended with studies of new archival material, so much the better for the reader, in our opinion.

Copublished with Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA)
Design by Katja Gretzinger

 

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Quinn Latimer
Like a Woman - Essays, Readings, Poems

Quinn Latimer’s arresting writings find expression in literature and theory as well as contemporary art and its history. Moving from Southern California to central and southern Europe, crossing geographies and genres, her texts record specters and realities of culture, migration, and displacement, compounding the vagaries of rhetoric and poetics with those of personal history and criticism.

Composed in the space between the page and live performance, Latimer’s recent essays and poems collected here examine issues of genealogy and influence, the poverty and privilege of place, architecture’s relationship to language, and feminist economies of writing, reading, and art making. Shifting between written language and live address, between the needs of the internal and the external voice, Like a Woman retrieves the refrain, the litany, and the chorus, exploring their serial ecstasies and political possibilities.

Quinn Latimer is a poet and critic from California. Her writings and readings have been featured widely, including at Chisenhale Gallery, London; REDCAT, Los Angeles; and Qalandiya International, Ramallah/Jerusalem. Her books include Stories, Myths, Ironies, and Other Songs: Conceived, Directed, Edited, and Produced by M. Auder, coedited with Adam Szymczyk (Sternberg Press, 2014); Sarah Lucas: Describe This Distance (Mousse Publishing, 2013); Film as a Form of Writing, with Akram Zaatari (WIELS/Motto Books, 2013); and Rumored Animals (Dream Horse Press, 2012).

Latimer is editor in chief of publications for documenta 14.

Design by Sam de Groot

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Katja Novitskova
If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes

Edited by Kati Ilves, Katja Novitskova
Texts by Kati Ilves, Nora Khan, Jaak Tomberg, Toke Lykkeberg, Venus Lau

Today almost all aspects of human—and increasingly nonhuman—lives are being modeled by software. Transcending the limits of our planet, data collection has become a fundamental tool with which to map the earth and beyond. Katja Novitskova’s catalogue If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes, published for the Estonian Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale, addresses emerging potentialities between visual culture, big-data-driven processes, and ecology. Rather than commenting on the observable moment, Novitskova transforms these visual manifestations of data into immersive environments that serve as glimpses of a world yet to come.

Copublished with the Center for Contemporary Arts, Estonia
Design by Ott Metusala

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Matter Fictions
edited by Margarida Mendes


Contributions by 0(rphan)d(rift>), Ursula Biemann, Ccru, Kodwo Eshun, N. Katherine Hayles, Francis McKee, Margarida Mendes, Jussi Parikka, Mariana Silva, Jennifer Teets, Jason Waite

Matter Fictions addresses fiction as a mode of producing reality as well as the significance of matter—animal, vegetable, mineral, hybrid—beyond binaries. Recounting a partial history of our relation with matter, the eponymous exhibition at Museu Coleção Berardo (May 4–August 21, 2016) explored how the crossover between cosmological narratives, spatial revolutions of concrete poetry, and hypertextual and territorial fictions might impact our understanding of human agency in a time that calls for action on climate change and technocratic policies. This companion reader features contributions from participating artists and like-minded writers that address the scope of this project as it exceeds the frame of art and the exhibition into the realm of nonhuman ecologies, ontologies, and temporalities.

The texts are oriented around the four threads that structured the exhibition. The science-fiction approach to the ethics of code and digital space is addressed in the texts by Kodwo Eshun of the Otolith Group, Ccru (Cybernetic culture resource unit), and N. Katherine Hayles, and the excerpt from 0(rphan)d(rift>)’s 1995 novel Cyberpositive. Contemporary psychogeophysics and the material realities of the digital are explored by Jussi Parikka’s text and printed drawings throughout the book based on Joana Escoval’s sculptures on electromagnetic conduction. The hybridity of contemporary bodies and rituals is contextualized by Margarida Mendes’s essay on agribusiness and GMOs. And the critique of technocratic and extractionist environmental policies is represented by Jason Waite’s text on Fukushima and artist statements by Ursula Biemann and Mariana Silva. The contributions from Jennifer Teets and Francis McKee straddle all four threads—Teets’s through a reflection on the ongoing series at Museu Berardo, The World in Which We Occur, which she organizes with Mendes, and McKee’s through a newly commissioned work of fiction.

Copublished with Museu Coleção Berardo
Design by Sena/Luz

 

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