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Vogliamo Tutto
The novel of Italy’s hot autumn

“Noi vogliamo tutto: We want everything – all the wealth, all the power, and no work.”

Torino, 1969. Fiat’s giant Mirafiori plant is a magnet for thousands of young southern workers, who go north to escape oppression, poverty and underdevelopment and find only exploitation and abuse on the assembly lines. “Vogliamo tutto” – “We want everything” – is the chant of angry workers in the wildcat strikes during this season of rebellion that sparked a decade of political upheaval in Italy. And Vogliamo tutto is the story of one young southerner’s experiences, a story of emigration, the revolt against work and the birth of political consciousness.

Drawing on interviews, flyers and the movement’s bulletins, Nanni Balestrini documents these workers’ experiences on the factory floor, in the meetings and demonstrations and, finally, at the barricades to create a poetic remix of a novel, a searching documentary and a call to arms for a just society.

“Only Balestrini … has succeeded in reconciling the tragic-epic spirit of the revolutionary movement and the ironic-combinatorial spirit of literary experimentation … Vogliamo tutto is probably the most important Italian literary work of the 1960s.” – Franco Berardi(Bifo)

Nanni Balestrini, a poet, author and visual artist, was born in Milan in 1935 and now lives in Rome. In the early ’60s he was a member of the poetry group Novissimi and, along with Umberto Eco and Eduardo Sanguinetti, of Gruppo 63, which brought together writers of the Neoavanguardia movement. In 1961 he composed Tape Mark I, the first poem made using the combining possibilities of an early IBM computer.He is the author of numerous volumes of poetry, including the Signorina Richmond cycle and Blackout. His novels include La Violenza Illustrata, L’editore (on the death of publisher Giangiacomo Feltrinelli in a supposed terrorist action) and Gli Invisibili. He was also involved in founding the cultural magazines Il Verri, Alfabeta and Zoooom.Balestrini was a founding member of far-left group Potere Operaio and a supporter of Autonomia Operaia. In 1979, along with many other intellectuals and activists in Italy’s extra-parliamentary left, he was accused of membership of an armed organisation and with subversive association. He fled to France to avoid arrest, where he lived in exile until the charges were dropped in 1984.

Designed by Warren Taylor.

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Paul Bai
Works 2005-2006

Paul Bai was born in Tianjin, China in 1968. He migrated to Australia in 1988 and graduated with a Bachelor of Visual Arts (Honours) from the Queensland College of Art in 1992. Bai first came to artworld attention in 1998 when he collaborated on the infamous Alderton Gallery performance. He has since embraced a range of collaborative possibilities, including designing posters for the Austrian artist Josef Strau and participating in the projects of Melbourne duo Burchill/McCamley. Bai has also had several solo exhibitions in Australia and overseas, including at the Institute of Modern Art in 2002.

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Ant Farm 1976–1978 Australia
David Pestorius (ed.)

The San Francisco conceptualists Ant Farm (1968–1978) are rightly famous for their radical architecture (The House of the Century, 1973), iconic land art (Cadillac Ranch, 1974), and pioneering video/performance (Media Burn, 1975).

Much less well-known are Ant Farm’s projects in Australia. Yet it is undeniable that their 10 week visit to Australia in mid 1976 turned the group upside down in more ways than one. Importantly, the focus of their work shifted, with Oceania not only becoming an important base, but also a critical concept for the group. Central to this shift was perhaps Ant Farm’s most ambitious project, the Dolphin Embassy (1974–1978), and in January 1977 the group’s co-founder Doug Michels relocated to Sydney to establish a consulate there.

Until now, the historical accounts of Ant Farm have misrepresented and misunderstood the nature and extent of the group’s work in Australia. Equally, Ant Farm’s projects are invisible in any account of Australian art.

Ant Farm 1976–1978 Australia (KANN-Verlag, Frankfurt, 2014, 23.5 x 18.5 cm, b&w, 155 pages, edited by David Pestorius, with cover by Liam Gillick), is the first book devoted to the activities and critical reception of Ant Farm in Australia. It adopts a form favoured by Ant Farm — the photo-collage — and critically builds upon their artist’s book Dolphin Embassy (Log: 1976–1978), Sydney, Australia.

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Ant Farm 1876–1978 Australia
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Re-print#1: 123 (1992)
Stephen Bram and David Morrison

In 1992, artist Stephen Bram and architect David Morrison collaborated in the production of three staple-bound, xeroxed books to accompany an exhibition at City Gallery, Melbourne. The books were published in a small edition by Pataphysics Books, run by Leo Edelstein and Yanni Florence. Re-Print #1: 1, 2, 3 presents the three books produced by Bram and Morrison, collated in a single 1:1 scale reprint.

The Re-Print project is a curated series that reintroduces out-of-print artist publications to a contemporary audience. The series also exploits the character of the reprints to insert interventions in public archives: introducing material that was never legally deposited, or reinserting previously archived publications in the form of mediated replications, thereby indexing the originals.

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