Bruce Conner

softart-cover-1softart-spread-1

Soft Art
Ralph Pomeroy (Ed.)


Incredibly scarce, collectable catalogue published on the occasion of the exhibition “Soft Art”, organized by Ralph Pomeroy at New Jersey State Museum Cultural Center, March – April 1969.

With an introductory essay by Pomeroy and works throughout by the artists featured in the exhibition : Richard Artschwager, Thomas Bang, Sue Bitney, John Chamberlain, Bruce Conner, Paul Harris, Eva Hesse, Susan Lewis, Jean Lindner, Robert Morris, Harold Paris, Robert Rohm, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier, Richard Tuttle, William Wegman.
Includes a list of the works exhibited, artist biographies and a list of lenders. A historic, very rarely seen catalogue.

* Condition: Very Good (excellent tight, clean copy) – All care is taken to provide accurate condition details of used books, photos available on request.

Description
Soft Art (1969)
Product Options
#OptionPriceStock
1-$290.001
Shipping
Shipping Rate: A
Order Soft Art (1969) - @ $290.00
MORE...

DIFFERENT DRUMMERS

Catalogue for the 1988 exhibition at the Hirshhorn Museum, featuring Wallace Berman, Clyde Connell, Bruce Conner, Oyvind Fahlstrom, Robert Helm, Alfred Jensen, Jess, Luis Jimenez and Peter Saul.

* Condition: Very Good (small crease to front cover) – All care is taken to provide accurate condition details of used books, photos available on request.

Description
Different Drummers
Product Options
#OptionPriceStock
1-$50.001
Shipping
Shipping Rate: C
Order Different Drummers - @ $50.00
MORE...
UnderTheClouds-coverUnderTheCloudsspread

Under the Clouds: from Paranoia to the Digital Sublime
João Ribas (ed.)


Since the second half of the 20th century, we have lived under the shadow of two clouds: the mushroom cloud of the atomic bomb, and the ‘cloud’ of distributed information networks. How did the central metaphor of cold war paranoia become the utopian metaphor of today? ‘Under the Clouds’ explores the contemporary sublime that has replaced the natural one, and the interrelated effects and affects of these two clouds on life and work, leisure and love, and on images, bodies, and minds.
The post-war technologies of the emergent third industrial revolution have now evolved to fit in the palm of our hand; we no longer merely look at images, we now touch, scroll, pinch, and drag them. Where is the border between the self and its data shadow, between information, matter, and affect? The biological, economic, aesthetic, and political effects of living under the clouds has taken the form of new relations between data and material, as well as increasing debt and abstract financialization; the changing nature of work and sex; and new relationships between screens, images, and things. As earlier forms of technologically inflected art sought to mitigate the effects of change — both on perception and society — many of today’s artistic practices confront the myriad interfaces and decentralized networks that continue to shape and transform daily life, forming new evolving connections between bits and atoms.

Texts by
Enrico Baj & Sergio Dangelo, Thomas Hirschhorn, Sean Landers, Metahaven, Seth Price, João Ribas, Frances Stark, Hito Steyerl, Stan VanDerBeek

Artists
Adel Abdessemed, Horst Ademeit, Cory Arcangel, Arte Nucleare, Darren Bader, Enrico Baj, Robert Barry, Eduardo Batarda, Thomas Bayrle, Neïl Beloufa, René Bertholo, Joseph Beuys, K.P. Brehmer, Bruce Conner, Kate Cooper, Gregory Corso, Guy Debord, Harun Farocki, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Carla Filipe, General Idea, Melanie Gilligan, Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville, Peter Halley, Rachel Harrison, Mona Hatoum, Pedro Henriques, Thomas Hirschhorn, Yves Klein, Sean Landers, Elad Lassry, Mark Lombardi, Julie Mehretu, Katja Novitskova, Ken Okiishi, Trevor Paglen, Nam June Paik, Silvestre Pestana, Pratchaya Phinthong, Seth Price, Martha Rosler, Thomas Ruff, Jacolby Satterwhite, Ângelo de Sousa, Frances Stark, Haim Steinbach, Hito Steyerl, Jean Tinguely, Adelhyd van Bender, Stan VanDerBeek, Andy Warhol, Christopher Williams, Christopher Wool, Anicka Yi

Description
Under the Clouds: from Paranoia to the Digital Sublime
Product Options
#OptionPriceStock
1-$58.001
Shipping
Shipping Rate: D
Order Under the Clouds: from Paranoia to the Digital Sublime - @ $58.00
MORE...

Looking for Bruce Conner
by Kevin Hatch


In a career that spanned five decades, most of them spent in San Francisco, Bruce Conner (1933–2008) produced a unique body of work that refused to be contained by medium or style. Whether making found-footage films, hallucinatory ink-blot graphics, enigmatic collages, or assemblages from castoffs, Conner took up genres as quickly as he abandoned them. His movements within San Francisco’s counter-cultural scenes were similarly free-wheeling; at home in beat poetry, punk music, and underground film circles, he never completely belonged to any of them. Bruce Conner belonged to Bruce Conner. Twice he announced his own death; during the last years of his life he produced a series of pseudonymous works after announcing his “retirement.” In this first book-length study of Conner’s enormously influential but insufficiently understood career, Kevin Hatch explores Conner’s work as well as his position on the geographical, cultural, and critical margins.

Hatch finds a set of abiding concerns that inform Conner’s wide-ranging works and changing personas. A deep anxiety pervades the work, reflecting a struggle between private, unknowable, interior experience and a duplicitous world of received images and false appearances. The profane and the sacred, the comic and the tragic, the enigmatic and the universal: each of these antinomies is pushed to the breaking point in Conner’s work.

Generously illustrated with many color images of Conner’s works, Looking for Bruce Conner proceeds in roughly chronological fashion, from Conner’s notorious assemblages (BLACK DAHLIA and RATBASTARD among them) through his experimental films (populated by images from what Conner called “the tremendous, fantastic movies going in my head from all the scenes I’d seen”), his little-known graphic work, and his collage and inkblot drawings.

Kevin Hatch is Assistant Professor of Art History at Binghamton University.

“Kevin Hatch’s study is an overdue corrective to the near absence of Bruce Conner from the major chronicles of contemporary art. The book captures the singularity of each aspect of the artist’s heterogeneous oeuvre and convincingly situates it at the very forefront of transformative practices in postwar art.”
Bruce Jenkins, Professor, Department of Film, Video, New Media, and Animation, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

“At long last, a book that seeks to come to terms with the remarkable accomplishments and the pervasive mystery of Bruce Conner’s art. Engagingly written and effectively and copiously illustrated, Looking for Bruce Conner is both tribute and analysis. Until now, the achievement of Conner’s immense body of work has been lost through its dismemberment into cinema, assemblage, drawing, collage, inkblots, pranks, and so on. One can only be grateful to Kevin Hatch for re-membering the continuities of this achievement. Looking for Bruce Conner is chock-full of interesting and useful information about Conner’s thinking and his working process; it will be an important resource for years to come.”
Scott MacDonald, Professor of Film History, Hamilton College; author of A Critical Cinema and other books

“Bruce Conner has been a notoriously difficult artist for critics to come to terms with, and his wide-ranging influence on contemporary art and popular culture is only beginning to be understood. The brilliance of Kevin Hatch’s approach is not just his intelligent, deep engagement with Conner’s work and persona but the insightful and respectful manner in which he lets Conner simply be what he was–a remarkable, ornery, elusive master, impossible and inappropriate to categorize.”
Mark Toscano, Film Archivist and Curator

Description
Looking for Bruce Connor
Product Options
#OptionPriceStock
1-$54.000
Shipping
Shipping Rate: D

Out of Stock

MORE...