Daria Martin

In the Holocene
João Ribas (Ed.)

Contributions by Berenice Abbott, Leonor Antunes, Marcel Broodthaers, Roger Callois, Hanne Darboven and Lucy R. Lippard, Eric Duyckaerts, Max Frisch, Frederich Froebel, Joao Maria Gusmao and Pedro Paiva, Florian Hecker and Quintin Meillasoux, Alfred Jarry, On Kawara, John Latham, Sol LeWitt, F. T. Marinetti, Daria Martin, Mario Merz, Helen Mirra, Man Ray, Ben Rivers and Mark von Schlegell, Pamela Rosenkranz and Erik Wysocan, Robert Smithson, Paul Valéry, Iannis Xenakis

In the Holocene is based on a 2012 group exhibition of the same name at the MIT List Visual Arts Center that explored art as a speculative science, investigating principles more commonly associated with scientific or mathematical thought. Through the work of an intergenerational group of artists, the exhibition and book propose that art acts as an investigative and experimental form of inquiry, addressing or amending what is explained through traditional scientific or mathematical means: entropy, matter, time (cosmic, geological), energy, topology, mimicry, perception, consciousness, et cetera. Sometimes employing scientific methodologies or the epistemology of science, other times investigating phenomena not restricted to any scientific discipline, art can be seen as a form of inquiry into the physical and natural world. In this sense, both art and science share an interest in knowledge, realism, and observable phenomena, yet are subject to different logics, principles of reasoning, and conclusions.

Works by Berenice Abbott, John Baldessari, Rosa Barba, Robert Barry, Uta Barth, Joseph Beuys, Alighiero Boetti, Carol Bove, Marcel Broodthaers, Matthew Buckingham, Hanne Darboven, Thea Djordjadze, Aurélien Froment, Terry Fox, Laurent Grasso, João Maria Gusmão and Pedro Paiva, Rashid Johnson, Kitty Kraus, Germaine Kruip, Daria Martin, John McCracken, Trevor Paglen, Man Ray, Ben Rivers, Pamela Rosenkranz, Robert Smithson, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Georges Vantongerloo, Lawrence Weiner

Copublished with MIT List Visual Arts Center
Design by Kloepfer-Ramsey-Kwon

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Daria Martin
Sensorium Tests

This monograph revolves around Daria Martin’s new film “Sensorium Tests,” 2011, which uses the recently recognized neurological condition of mirror-touch synaesthesia to explore how sensations are transmitted, shared, and created in film, raising the question: Can a spectator feel a bodily reaction to film? Exploring the spectrum that lies between sight and touch, the publication includes key texts selected by Martin into such pressing issues, which are also related to voyeurism and projection, artificial intelligence, and magic, from a host of leading writers and thinkers from Mary Shelley to Wayne Koestenbaum, via Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Rainer-Werner Fassbinder, and Laura Mulvey. Martin’s introduction to this section addresses subjects such as mirroring, paralysis, and animism, asking such far-reaching questions as how empathy and desire, identification and lust are related.

Daria Martin was born in San Francisco in 1973 and currently lives in London. Martin’s work has been presented in solo exhibitions at Der Kunstverein, seit 1817 in Hamburg, Kunsthalle Zürich, and The Showroom in London. She has participated in numerous group exhibitions including “Uncertain States of America,” which originated at the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art in Oslo and traveled internationally; “Emblematic Display” at the ICA in London; “Beck’s Futures,” also at the ICA; and “The Moderns” at Castello di Rivoli in Turin, among many others. Her films have been screened in many international venues, including Tate Modern, Tate Britain, and the Royal College of Art in Lodon; the Secession in Vienna; and Arnolfini in Bristol.

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Poor Man’s Expression: Technology, Experimental Film, Conceptual Art A Compendium in Texts and Images
Martin Ebner, Florian Zeyfang (Eds.)

With texts by Sabeth Buchmann, Anselm Franke, Ariane Müller, Branden Joseph, Stefanie Schulte Strathaus, Ian White, Axel John Wieder

Poor Man’s Expression examines the relationship between film, video, technology, and art, with a particular focus on the reciprocal influences between conceptual art and experimental film. The publication is based on the eponymous exhibition in Berlin in 2006, but represents an independent compendium of texts and images beyond the show. Works, lectures and performances by international artists, created for the exhibition and expanded for the publication, are set alongside historical experimental films from the archive of the Freunde der Deutschen Kinemathek in Berlin. The authors and artists respond to the questions that arise as to the semantics of critical and experimental conceptual art, medial representation, and the expansion of a concept of technology towards social functions and psychology; they explore problems of medial control, intellectual property, and a changing concept of the public.

as a point of departure we have assumed that there was once a close relationship between forms that now exist rather separately, namely the realms of visual art, experimental film, literature, poetry, music – and very much the development of technology, too. what is it supposed to mean that 16mm projectors now occupy their luxurious final performance sites at art societies and galleries, while iphone youtube (without open source codecs, to be sure) is the current way to watch a hollis frampton interview.

the other way around, isn’t the gentle entry of the genre of “experimental film” into the realm of “media art” of the 1980s and 1990s itself a transformation analog to general social and medial development brought about by the development of individualization and consumer society? in poor man’s expression we have sought, through an advanced setting (“affirmative” neon light surfaces, and the exhibition’s “paradoxical” bipartite spatial principle) to address the surrounding “corporate public” architecture of the sony center as well as the film archive deep underground and the dark cinema space of the “avant-garde cinema.”

Artists: Stephanie Taylor, Sebestyén Kodolányi, Sebastian Lütgert, Henrik Olesen, Mathias Poledna, Sean Snyder, Daria Martin, Kirsten Pieroth, Martin Ebner, Florian Zeyfang

Images: Anthony Balch, Len Lye, Carolee Schneeman, Bruce Conner, Harry Smith, Joyce Wieland, George Landow, Marie Menken, Ken Jacobs, Rober Breer, Emile Cohl, a.o.

In collaboration with Arsenal Institute for Film and Video art

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