David Askevold

Foul Perfection : Essays and Criticism
by Mike Kelley

The work of artist Mike Kelley (b. 1954) embraces performance, installation, drawing, painting, video, and sculpture. Drawing distinctively on high art and vernacular traditions, including historical research, popular culture, and psychology, Kelley came to prominence in the 1980s with a series of sculptures composed of craft materials. His recent work offers dialogues with architecture and with repressed memory syndrome, and a sustained inquiry into his own aesthetic and social history. The subjects on which Kelley has written are as varied as his artistic media. They include the work of fellow artists, sound, caricature, the uncanny, UFOlogy, and gender-bending.

This book offers a diverse collection of Kelley’s writings from the last twenty-five years. It contains major critical texts on art, film, and the wider culture, including his piece on the aesthetic he calls “urban Gothic.” It also contains essays, mostly commissioned for exhibition catalogs and journals, on the artists and groups David Askevold, Öyvind Fahlström, Douglas Huebler, John Miller, Survival Research Laboratories, and Paul Thek, among others. Kelley’s voices are passionate, analytic, and ironic, and his critical intelligence is leavened with touches of whimsy.

Reviews
“This collection proves that [Kelley] has not only helped write history but has had an effect on it.” — Diedrich Diederichsen, Artforum

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Foul Perfection by Mike Kelley
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Information
edited by Sarah Cook


This anthology provides the first art-historical reassessment of information-based art in relation to data structures and exhibition curation. It examines such landmark exhibitions as “Information” at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1970, and the equally influential “Les Immatériaux,” initiated by the philosopher Jean-François Lyotard at the Centre Pompidou, Paris, in 1984. It reexamines work by artists of the 1960s to early 1980s, from Les Levine and N. E. Thing Co. to General Idea and Jenny Holzer, whose prescient grasp of information’s significance resonates today. It also reinscribes into the narrative of art history technologically critical artworks that for years have circulated within new media festivals rather than in galleries.

While information science draws distinctions between “information,” signals, and data, artists from the 1960s to the present have questioned the validity and value of such boundaries. Artists have investigated information’s materiality, in signs, records, and traces; its immateriality, in hidden codes, structures, and flows; its embodiment, in instructions, social interaction, and political agency; its overload, or uncontrollable excess, challenging utopian notions of networked society; its potential for misinformation and disinformation, subliminally altering our perceptions; and its post-digital unruliness, unsettling fixed notions of history and place.

Artists surveyed include
David Askevold, Iain Baxter, Guy Bleus, Heath Bunting, CAMP (Shaina Anand & Ashok Sukumaran), Ami Clarke, Richard Cochrane, Rod Dickinson, Hans Haacke, Graham Harwood, Jenny Holzer, Joseph Kosuth, Christine Kozlov, Steve Lambert and the Yes Men, Oliver Laric, Les Levine, László Moholy-Nagy, Muntadas, Erhan Muratoglu, Raqs Media Collective, Erica Scourti, Stelarc, Thomson & Craighead, Angie Waller, Stephen Willats, Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries, Elizabeth Vander Zaag

Writers include
James Bridle, Matthew Fuller, Francesca Gallo, Antony Hudek, Eduardo Kac, Friedrich Kittler, Arthur and Marielouise Kroker, Scott Lash, Alessandro Ludovico, Jean-François Lyotard, Charu Maithani, Suhail Malik, Armin Medosch, Srinivas Aditya Mopidevi, Craig Saper, Jorinde Seijdel, Tom Sherman, Felix Stalder, McKenzie Wark, Benjamin Weil

About the Editor
Sarah Cook is a curator and researcher working at the intersection of art, digital and electronic media, and science. She is the coauthor (with Beryl Graham) of Rethinking Curating: Art After New Media (MIT Press), and in 2004 cocurated the touring exhibition, “Database Imaginary.” She is Dundee Fellow at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, University of Dundee.

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Information (Documents of Contemporary Art)
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Art & Project Bulletins 1 – 156
September 1968 - November 1989

From the earliest days in 1968 when the bulletin appeared Under the title of “Architectural Research” the Small statement printed on the bottom of the front page rings out with the spirit of its time : “art & project plans to bring you together with the ideas of artists, architects and technicians to discover an intelligent form for your living and working space. Art & project invites you to participate in its exhibitions which will explore ways in which art, architecture and technology can combine with you own ideas.”

From Daniel Buren’s transparent bulletin to Sol Lewitt’s beautiful bulletin folded into 48 small squares, from Bas Jan Ader’s final bulletin mailed during his last work in which he died to Gilbert & George’s fragile double portrait, these issues are a unique moving international artwork that stands apart from anything else in this period in its breath of artists included and quality of original work involved. It is increasingly included in exhibitions concerned with Conceptual Art and its influences. The complete set is of prime interest to major private collectors and museums and libraries concerned with the artists involved with the bulletins. These 156 issues encapsulate an era.

Published in conjunction with the exhibition held at Cabinet Gallery, London, October 17 – December 23, 2011; & Christophe Daviet-Thery Livres et éditions d’artistes, Paris, October 27 – December 23, 2011.
Text by Clive Phillpot.
Interview between Adriaan van Ravesteijn and Tin Geerts.
Edited by Louise Riley-Smith.
Designed by Jérome Saint-Loubert Bié.

Documents the 156 Art & Project Bulletins published between 1968 and 1989 produced by artists: Charlotte Posenenske, CCC / Jan Slothouber / William Graatsma, Gruppe X, Willy Orskov, Paul Schuitema, Aldo van den Nieuwelaar, Ad Dekkers, Gianfredo Camesi, Ed Sommer, Stanley Brouwn, Jan Dibbets, Bernd Lohaus, Lawrence Weiner, Rainer Giese, W. Knoebel, Joseph Kosuth, Peter Struycken, Robert Barry, Sol LeWitt, Ger van Elk, Gilbert & George, Yutaka Matsuzawa, Douglas Huebler, Keith Arnatt, Daniel Buren, Emmy van Leersum, Gijs Bakker, Hideto Yamazaki, Mel Bochner, Hanne Darboven, Boezem, Ian Wilson, John Baldessari, Bas Jan Ader, David Askevold, Willem Breuker, William Leavitt, Alighiero Boetti, Marcel Broodthaers, Naomi Spector, Robert Ryman, Carl Andre, Ulrich Rückriem, Stephen Rosenthal, Martin Maloney, Richard Long, Roy Colmer, David Tremlett, Stephen Antonakos, Alan Charlton, Carel Visser, Barry Flanagan, Allen Ruppersberg, Francesco Clemente, Hamish Fulton, Daan van Golden, Mimmo Paladino, Sandro Chia, Jaap Berghuis, Andrew Lord, Nicholas Pope, Salvo, Bruce McLean, Toon Verhoef, Enzo Cucchi, Joris Geurts, Emo Verkerk, Narcisse Tordoir, Tomas Rajlich, Adam Colton, Tony Cragg, Jan Commandeur, David Robilliard, Zadok Ben-David, Didier Vermeiren, Leo Vroegindeweji, Han Schuil, Ab van Hanegem.

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Art & Project Bulletins 1 - 156 : September 1968 - November 1989
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