Derek Jarman

UndergroundInteriors-coverUndergroundInteriors-spread

Underground Interiors
Decorating for Alternate Life Styles (Oberto Gili, Norma Skurka Eds.)

At the start of the 1970’s, at the very beginning of renowned photographer Oberto Gili’s professional career (Architectural Digest, Vogue, House & Garden, Town & Country), he moved to Milan to work for L’Esperto, a publishing company…
“… to shoot and produce a book that was to be called ‘Crazy, Mad, Outrageous Interiors’.  I traveled around the world for a year working on this book. L’Esperto dropped the project, but Norma Skurka, The New York Times interiors editor those days, took over and Quadrangle Books published the book in 1972.  It was called ‘Underground Interiors’.”
– Oberto Gili

First soft cover edition of this cult classic interior design book – the only one of its kind. This lavishly illustrated book features the deluxe photography of eclectic and inspired domestic settings  from all over the world c. early 1970s: “Surrealist Interiors”, “Environments”, “Radical Chic”, “Pop Culture”, “Space Age Habitations”…  An incredible piece of interior design history.

Includes the living spaces of Karl Lagerfeld, Derek Jarman, Zandra Rhodes, Marina Lante della Rovere, Nanda Vigo, Alan Buchsbaum, Julie Christie, to name only a handful.

“Not just another book on interior decoration with look-alike rooms, Underground Interiors is a fantastic mind-expanding experience into contemporary life styles.”

* Condition: Good-Very Good (light shelf bumping to cover edges, corners, otherwise bright, tight copy throughout)  – All care is taken to provide accurate condition details of used books, photos available on request.

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Underground Interiors
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Queer-coverQueer-spread

QUEER
edited by David J. Getsy

Historically, “queer” was the slur used against those who were perceived to be or made to feel abnormal. Beginning in the 1980s, “queer” was reappropriated and embraced as a badge of honor. While queer draws its politics and affective force from the history of non-normative, gay, lesbian, and bisexual communities, it is not equivalent to these categories, nor is it an identity. Rather, it offers a strategic undercutting of the stability of identity and of the dispensation of power that shadows the assignment of categories and taxonomies. Artists who identify their practices as queer today call forth utopian and dystopian alternatives to the ordinary, adopt outlaw stances, embrace criminality and opacity, and forge unprecedented kinships, relationships, loves, and communities.

Rather than a book of queer theory for artists, this is a book of artists’ queer tactics and infectious concepts. By definition, there can be no singular “queer art.” Here, in the first Documents of Contemporary Art anthology to be centered on artists’ writings, numerous conversations about queer practice are brought together from diverse individual, social and cultural contexts. Together these texts describe and examine the ways in which artists have used the concept of queer as a site of political and institutional critique, as a framework to develop new families and histories, as a spur to action, and as a basis from which to declare inassimilable difference.

Artists and writers include
Nayland Blake, Gregg Bordowitz, Leigh Bowery, AA Bronson, A. K. Burns, Giuseppe Campuzano, Tee Corinne, Barbara DeGenevieve, Dyke Action Machine!, Elmgreen & Dragset, Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Simon Fujiwara, Malik Gaines, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Gran Fury, Sunil Gupta, Hahn Thi Pham, Harmony Hammond, Sharon Hayes, Hudson, Roberto Jacoby, Derek Jarman, Isaac Julien, Mahmoud Khaled, Zoe Leonard, Lesbian Avengers, Catherine Lord, Ma Liuming, LTTR, Allyson Mitchell, Zanele Muholi, Carlos Motta, Ocaña, Hélio Oiticica, Catherine Opie, Ridykeulous (Nicole Eisenman & A.L. Steiner), Marlon Riggs, Emily Roysdon, Prem Sahib, Assoto Saint, Tejal Shah, Amy Sillman, Jack Smith, Wolfgang Tillmans, Toxic Titties, Danh Vo, David Wojnarowicz, Wu Tsang, Yan Xing, Las Yeguas del Apocalipsis, Akram Zaatari, Sergio Zevallos

About the Editor

David J. Getsy is Goldabelle McComb Finn Distinguished Professor of Art History at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His books include Abstract Bodies: Sixties Sculpture in the Expanded Field of Gender, Scott Burton: Collected Writings on Art and Performance, and Rodin: Sex and the Making of Modern Sculpture.

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Queer (Documents of Contemporary Art)
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Brian Dillon
Objects in This Mirror

“Like Roland Barthes and Virginia Woolf, Brian Dillon pays lavish attention to curious byways that usually go without saying. In sentences at once playful and majestic, he plumbs the intellectual depths of his subjects, and reveals a perverse, nearly dandyish love for odd facts and iconoclastic vistas. There is more than a touch of W. G. Sebald—the Wordsworthian wanderer, the romantic itinerant—in Dillon’s melancholy yet mood-spiked attitude toward the material objects that greet his sober, ever-evaluating eye.  Reading Objects in This Mirror, we participate in Dillon’s restless perambulations, and we are delighted to be thus transported.”
—Wayne Koestenbaum

Objects in This Mirror is a collection of essays on contemporary art, literature, landscape, aesthetics, and cultural history. Beginning with a polemical and personal defense of generalism and curiosity, Brian Dillon explores the variety of themes it is possible today to corral within the rubric of the critical essay. These pieces engage with the work of such artists as Tacita Dean, Gerard Byrne, Andy Warhol, and Sophie Calle; with the ruinous territories that haunt the work of Robert Smithson and Derek Jarman; with the ambiguous figures of the charlatan, the vandal, the hypochondriac, and the dandy. Taking seriously the playful remit of the essay as form, Dillon treats of compelling obscurities: gesture manuals of the nineteenth century, the history of antidepressant marketing, the search for a cure to the common cold. Whether his topic is the nature of slapstick, his love of the writings of Roland Barthes, or the genre of the essay itself, he is as much concerned with the form of criticism today as with its varied and digressive subjects.

Design by John Morgan Studio

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