Ian Burn

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Anything Goes
Art in Australia 1970-1980

First printing of “Anything Goes : Art in Australia 1970-1980”, published by Art & Text in 1984. Edited by Paul Taylor, founder of Art & Text, this large, valuable volume of essays by leading writers of those years – covering all aspects of painting, sculpture, photography and experimental art forms since 1970 – features contributions by Janine Burks, Mary Eagle, Christine Godden, Robert Lindsay, Ian Burn, Julie Ewington, Memory Holloway, Terry Smith, Ann Stephen, Margaret Plant, Patrick McCaughey, Daniel Thomas.

“The 1970s were years of unprecedented change in Australian art and culture, and Anything Goes is the first book about that decade’s remarkable variety of art.”

Includes the work of: →↑→, Mike Parr, Howard Arkley, Jenny Watson, Donald Judd, Ian Burn, John Lethbridge, John Davis, Mel Bochner, Joseph Beuys, Mel Ramsden, Women’s Domestic Needlework Group, Andy Warhol, Tim Johnson, Nigel Lendon, Artsworkers Union, Robert Rooney, Clive Murray-White, Tony McGillick, Fred Williams, John Firth-Smith, George Haynes, Donald Laycock, Michael Taylor, Fred Cress, Ron Robertson-Swann, David Aspden, Sydney Ball, Roger Kemp, Paul Partos, Trevor Vickors, Robert Hunter, Robert Jacks, Vivienne Binns, Bonita Ely, Marie McMahon, Virginia Cuppaidge, Imants Tillers, Les Kossatz, Ti Parks, Peter Cripps, Ken Searle, Jan Senbergs, George Baldessin, John Armstrong, Janet Dawson, Dale Hickey, Tony Coleing, Marr Grounds, Chips Mackinolty, Ann Newmarch, Colin Little, Jan Mackay, Toni Robertson, Jenny Hill, Christo, Ross Grounds, Ken Unsworth, Kevin Mortensen, Stelarc, Jillian Orr, Hossein Valamanesh, W. Thomas Arthur, Ewa Pachucka, Vicki Varvaressos, Carol Jerrems, Elizabeth Gower, Geoff Hogg, Ann Newmarch, Peter Kennedy, Jon Rhodes, Bill Henson, Stephen Lojewski, Robert Owen, Mark Johnson, Peter Booth, John Dunkley-Smith
, Ron Robertson-Swann, Alun Leach-Jones, Michael Johnson, Lesley Dumbrell, Fred Cross, John Walker, David Aspden, and many more.

Paul Taylor (Melbourne, 1957–7 September 1992) was an Australian art critic, curator, editor and publisher. In 1981, he founded Art & Text, the contemporary art journal considered to be responsible for generating and promoting postmodernist discourse in Australian art.

* Condition: Very Good (tight, clean copy, tanning to cover edges/spine) – All care is taken to provide accurate condition details of used books, photos available on request.

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Anything Goes (1984)
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The Field

Rare and very collectable first edition of this iconic catalogue produced in 1968 to accompany “The Field”, regarded as a landmark exhibition in Australian art history – a radical showcase of 74 abstract and conceptual, colour field, geometric and hard edge artworks. Influenced by the American origins of abstract art, the exhibition opened to much controversy at the NGV in 1968 with its silver foil-covered walls and geometric light fittings, boldly launching the careers of a generation of young Australian artists including Sydney Ball, Peter Booth, Janet Dawson and Robert Jacks. It was the first the NGV staged in its new Swanston Street galleries.
Handsomely designed with its wrapped, french-flap, die-cut cover, the book includes profiles on each exhibiting artist in the exhibition, including colour and black and white reproductions of all 72 of the works exhibited.

On the occasion of its 50th anniversary the NGV will restage the exhibition as The Field Revisited, opening in May 2018 at The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia.

Texts by Elwyn Lynn, Patrick McCaughey, Royston Harpur, and an introduction by Brian Finemore (Curator) and John Stringer (Exhibitions Manager).

Artists included: Sydney Ball, Peter Booth, Janet Dawson, Robert Jacks, James Doolin, David Aspden, Tony Bishop, Ian Burn, Gunter Christmann, Tony Coleing, Noel Dunn, Garry Foulkes, Dale Hickey, Michael Johnson, Col Jordan, Michael Kitching, Alun Leach-Jones, Nigel Lendon, Tony McGillick, Clement Meadmore, Michael Nicholson, Harald Noritis, Alan Oldfield, Wendy Paramor, Paul Partos, John Peart, Emanuel Raft, Melvyn Ramsden, R.C. Robertson-Swann, Robert Rooney, Rollin Schlicht, Udo Sellbach, Eric Shirley, Joseph Szabo, Vernon Treweeke, Trevor Vickers, Dick Watkins, John White, Normana Wight.

* Condition: Good (very good and clean/tight throughout with only light wear to wraps inc. black ink mark to top spine, previous owner inscription to internal fold) small scraping to the top-left spine corner on cover wrap, light handling wear and light edge tanning, but a very good copy throughout otherwise) – All care is taken to provide accurate condition details of used books, photos available on request.

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The Field (1968)
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Illusion and Reality

Major Australian touring exhibition exploring realism and illusion in art (across new realist painting, pop, photography, conceptualism, minimalism, abstraction, ceramics, even architecture) with a catalogue of 71 works by 44 international artists and groups. Introduction and notes on the artists by John Stringer; statements by Audrey Flack, Stephen Posen and Josef Raffael; biographical notes on the artists, including exhibitions and collections; statement on realism by Raymond Williams. Exhibition organized by the Australian National Gallery, Canberra, and shown at seven locations throughout Australia.

Artists: Ian Burn, Gerhard Richter, Ed Ruscha, Joseph Kosuth, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Marilyn Levine, Dale Hickey, Jenny Watson, Jan Dibbets, Chuck Close, SITE, Michael Snow, Tom Wesselman, Claudio Bravo, Malcolm Morley, Michael Snow, Robert Bechtle, Tom Blackwell, Christian Boltanski, Santiago Cardenas, John Clem Clarke, William Delafield Cook,  Robert Cottingham, Don Eddy, Richard Estes, Audrey Flack, Ralph Goings, Jan Groover, Duane Hanson, Peter Kennedy, Ron Kleeman, Richard Larter, Victor Lance Henderson, Terry Schoonhoven, Richard McLean, Jud Nelson, John Okulick, Philip Pearlstein,, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Liliana Porter, Stephen Posen, Joseph Raffael, Ben Schonzeit, Paul Sharits, Sonia Landy Sheridan, and more.

* Condition: Very Good (light tanning/wear) – All care is taken to provide accurate condition details of used books, photos available on request.

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Illusion and Reality (1977)
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Technologism


Catalogue published to accompany the exhibition Technologism, at Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA) in Melbourne, 3 Oct – 12 Dec 2015, curated by Charlotte Day.

Artists: Cory Arcangel (US), Dara Birnbaum (US), Chris Burden (US), Ian Burn (AU), Antoinette J. Citizen (AU), Simon Denny (NZ), Jan Dibbets (NL), Aleksandra Domanović (SI/DE), Harun Farocki (DE), Benjamin Forster (AU), Isa Genzken (DE), Greatest Hits (AU), Martijn Hendriks (NL), Lynn Hershman Leeson (US), Matt Hinkley (AU), Jenny Holzer (US), Edward Kienholz & Nancy Reddin Kienholz (US), Oliver Laric (AT), Mark Leckey (UK), Scott Mitchell (AU), Rabih Mroué (LB), Henrik Olesen (DK), Nam June Paik (KR/US), Nam June Paik & John Godfrey (US), Joshua Petherick (AU), Matte Rochford (AU), Jill Scott (AU), Richard Serra (US), John F. Simon Jr. (US), Brian Springer (US), Hito Steyerl (DE), Ricky Swallow (AU), Jeff Thompson (US), Pia van Gelder (AU), Ulla Wiggen (US) and Dennis Wilcox (AU)

MUMA concludes its three-part series on watershed moments in art history — Reinventing the Wheel: the readymade century and Art as a Verb — with Technologism, a major group exhibition bringing together forty-three historical and contemporary artworks, including several new commissions from Australian practitioners. Technologism wrestles with the profound cultural, social and political impact technology has made on art since the 1960s.

Conservative cul-de-sac’s of the community are often sceptical of technology and its ever increasing presence in our lives. However many artists — with a natural propensity for constant upheaval — have whole-heartedly embraced radical changes in technology over the last sixty years. Featuring artworks that engage both physically and conceptually with electronic systems — television, computers, the internet, smartphones — Technologism focuses on the ways artists critique and disrupt official uses of the media, or construct their own machines and data systems.

Riffing off both the aesthetic and conceptual characteristics of technology, artists in Technologism document technology’s advancement in a plethora of ways: Ulla Wiggen’s intricate paintings of circuit boards from the mid 1960s, see the development of an aesthetic inspired by the complex intersection of electrical wires, connectors and components, working to manipulate and rewire the physicality of technology; some thirty years later, John F. Simon’s Art Appliances series of the 1990s uses the circuitry of small LCD screens to disrupt pictures and patterns, recreating them over; in Matte Rochford’s video Progressively Degrading Test Pattern 2013, humble VHS tapes are copied and recopied, in a process of metaphysical reduction; while in Joshua Petherick’s new work, one technology is employed to record another soon to be superseded, revealing new visual dimensions and the ‘ghosts in the machine’.

A story of advancement inevitably turns into obsolescence, and Technologism seeks to document the early use of broadcast technology as a way of bridging the gap (and finding a space) between the image on the screen, the physical presence of the viewer, and the broader community. Jan Dibbet’s TV as a Fireplace 1968, documents television as a collective experience — even if viewers were separated physically, they were united through time and space like pre-historic cave-dwellers by a communal broadcast. However with the advent of the internet, personal computer devices and streaming services, technology has again changed the relationship we have with the world around us to a more singular yet proliferating existence.

A history of DIY jamming and hacking presents the way artists have continued to subvert conventional uses of technology and challenge the status-quo, from the internet as militarily-designed, to corporately-exploited, civilian-employed, artistically-manipulated, and back again. For instance, Lynn Hershman Leeson’s work investigates how media is used as a tool for censorship and political repression, while Simon Denny’s work co-opts the aesthetic and rhetoric of language of multinational corporations in order to question their power. In presenting these works and others, Technologism seeks to consider what is the value of such subversion, or is it merely a perpetuation of the problem?

Artist Hito Steyerl asks, ‘is the internet dead?’ Although, hyperbolic in its prognosis, Technologism recognises that sceptical questions such as this are an important part of how artistic practice negotiates technological advancement. Technologism proceeds from the idea that technology in all its forms, physical and immaterial, needs to be interrogated in order to be perpetually remade.

Technologism considers changes in infrastructure, such as telecommunication networks and the internet, and the cultural implications of technological innovation and considers from the position of the developers of these technologies as well as from the end user. Technologism asks ‘how does technology effect artistic practice?’ As well as, ‘how can artistic practice effect technology?’

Fully illustrated catalogue features texts by Charlotte Day, Philip Brophy, Bridget Crone and Sean Dockray. Designed by Yanni Florence.

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Technologism
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