Joan Mitchell

FROM THE CENTER : Feminist Essays on Women’s Art
by Lucy R. Lippard

Scarce first 1976 printing of this fantastic and now rarely seen book collection of essays by internationally acclaimed writer, art critic, activist and curator, Lucy R. Lippard.
“FROM THE CENTER : Feminist Essays on Women’s Art” is broken into three sections: GENERAL ESSAYS, MONOGRAPHS, and FICTION. GENERAL ESSAYS include 12 major essays such as “”Sexual Politics : Art Style”, “Household Images in Art”, “Fragments”, “What is Female Imagery”, “Making Up: Role-Playing and Transformation in Women’s Art”, “The Pains and Pleasures of Rebirth: European and American Women’s Body Art”, “The Womens’ Art Movement – What Next?” and more. MONOGRAPHS is made up of writings dedicated to single artists, including essays on the work of Eva Hesse, Adrian Piper, Jo Baer, Joan Mitchell, Hanne Darboven, Ree Morton, Louise Bourgeois, Faith Ringgold, Yvonne Rainer, Nancy Graves and many more. A suburb collection, illustrated throughout with examples of the work written about, including a colour plate section.

* Condition: Good (some text highlighting , light wear/creasing from age, otherwise tightly bound and clean, good copy)  – All care is taken to provide accurate condition details of used books, photos available on request.

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FROM THE CENTER by Lucy R. Lippard (1976)
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Art and Sexual Politics : Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?
Thomas B. Hess, Elizabeth C. Baker (Eds.)

Book edition of Linda Nochlin’s famous essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?”, that first appeared in the January 1971 issue of ARTnews, together with the follow-up essay “GREAT WOMEN ARTISTS” by Thomas B. Hess. Together these texts are followed by a collection of ten essay replies to “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?”, including “Dialogue” by Elaine de Kooning with Rosalyn Drexler; “The Hermaphrodite” by Bridget Riley; “Do Your Work” by Louise Nevelson; “Women without Pathos” by Eleanor Antin; “The Double-Bind” by Suzi Gablik; “Healthy Self-Love” by Sylvia Stone; “Moving Out, Moving Up” by Marjorie Strider; “Social Conditions Can Change” by Lynda Benglis; “Artists Transgress All Boundaries” by Rosemarie Castoro; “SEXUAL ART-POLITICS” by Elizabeth C. Baker; and “IN THE UNIVERSITY” by Lee Hall. Five sections of the book are made up of exemplary art works by Agnes Martin, Eva Hesse, Mary Bauermeister, Lee Hall, Nancy Graves, Dorothea Rockburne, Lee Bontecou, Jo Baer, Niki de St. Phalle, Kiki Kogelnik, Deborah Remington, Joan Snyder, Louise Nevelson, Lynda Benglis, Eleanor Antin, Sylvia Stone, Suzi Gablik, Joan Mitchell, Bridget Riley, Sylvia Sleigh, Jean Follett, Charmion Von Wiegand, Louise Bourgeois, Marcia Marcus,Marisol, Louisa Matthiasdottir, Chryssa, Mary Frank, Perle Fine, Elaine de Kooning, Roslyn Drexler, and many more.

* Condition: Good (general light wear and edge tanning) – All care is taken to provide accurate condition details of used books, photos available on request.

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Art and Sexual Politics
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Joan Mitchell
Retrospective – Her Life and Paintings


This is a large-scale survey of the iconic artist Joan Mitchell (1925–1992), which focusses on painting, from the early work of the 1950s to her last years, presenting nearly 30 paintings by one of 20th century art’s most significant protagonists.

A large part of the exhibition and this accompanying publication is dedicated to the first extensive public presentation of archival materials, providing an extraordinary insight into the artist’s fascinating life. Film, photographs, and other ephemera shed light on Joan Mitchell’s personality and her relationship to such cultural figures as Elaine de Kooning, Frank O’Hara, and Samuel Beckett.

Mitchell’s early work displayed an affiliation to the New York School, but her gestural application of paint changed by the end of the 1950s on moving to France when she began citing such painters as Vincent van Gogh as role models. This retrospective gathers together works from the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, and from private collections, some of which have rarely or never been publicly shown before.

Yilmaz Dziewior, in his essay, locates Mitchell’s work within an art historical context, whilst the current relevance of her painting is discussed, in conversation, by Isabelle Graw and Jutta Koether and in a separate text by Ken Okiishi, as a representative of a younger generation. An illustrated timeline, compiled by Laura Morris, once again interweaves Mitchell’s life and work.

Published on the occasion of the exhibition Joan Mitchell: Retrospective – Her Life and Paintings at Kunsthaus Bregenz, 10 July – 25 October 2015.

Due to the weight of this volume, your order will likely incur additional postage costs.  We will contact you with the best shipping advice upon your order, or alternatively, please email us in advance.  Thank you for understanding.

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TEXTE ZUR KUNST #101
MARCH 2016 “POLARITIES”

 


ISSUE NO. 101 / MARCH 2016 “POLARITIES”

Issue No. 101 of Texte zur Kunst takes “Polarities” as its theme – a term we associate with what’s unfolding around us right now: ideological polarization, from Pegida to Donald Trump. How do we understand the growing gap between the ideals of tech/smooth space (where the art world tends to reside, swiftly neutralizing any resistance as “content”) and the striated regions of material unrest? How do we understand “polarization” despite our dominant, and inherently continuous, neoliberal system? Given these macro conditions in which art critical and art historical discourses are currently being formed, and within which they will need to position themselves, could the image of polarization be something not to avoid but to engage; perhaps even a potentially generative model for times that are anything but ideology-free?

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE

ET SOUS LA PLAGE … ? / Philipp Felsch interviews Timothy Brennan on the state of left theory

HELMUT DRAXLER
ALWAYS POLARIZE? / Conditions and limitations of a model of argumentation

LIBERTY, EQUALITY, SECURITY / Four questions for Carolin Emcke

ENTER THE VOID / Roy Scranton and @LILINTERNET on hyperreality and reflexive narrative

DANIEL COLUCCIELLO BARBER AND DAVIS RHODES
THE TERROR WITHIN

ANTEK WALCZAK
GLOBALLY POSITIONED

GABRIELE WERNER
HEIMAT / Notes on the enduring renaissance of an idea
BILDSTRECKE

GERHARD RICHTER
“12 PHOTOGRAPHS OF ULRIKE MEINHOF” / Taken in October 1966 for “Konkret” by Inge-Maria Peters
NEW DEVELOPMENT

NATIONAL CUSTOMS / Sven Lütticken on Germany’s Kulturgutschutzgesetz
ROTATION

IST DER MENSCH DOCH NOCH ZU RETTEN? / Svenja Bromberg über Nina Powers Aufsatzsammlung „Das kollektive politische Subjekt“
HEY MOTHERFUCKERS, HERE IS YOUR ­GENERATIONAL NOVEL / Tobias Madison über Seth Prices Roman „Fuck Seth Price“

SHORT WAVES

Hans-Jürgen Hafner über Daniel Richter in der Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt/M. / Astrid Mania über Verena Pfisterer bei Exile, Berlin / Ana Teixeira Pinto on Július Koller at the Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw / Beate Söntgen über Joan Mitchell im Museum Ludwig, Köln / Daniel Keller on Peter Fend at Barbara Weiss and Oracle, Berlin / Manfred Hermes über Anne Speier bei Silberkuppe, Berlin

REVIEWS

SPERRIGE NAHEVERHÄLTNISSE / Eva Kernbauer über „to expose, to show, to demonstrate, to inform, to offer. Künstlerische Praktiken um 1990“ im Mumok, Wien
DER GESCHMACK DES PRIVATEN / Barbara Buchmaier und Christine Woditschka über die Sammlung Würth im Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin
BENEFITS / Sarah Lookofsky on “Collected by Thea Westreich Wagner and Ethan ­Wagner” at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
NOBODY EVER DID WHAT WE DID / David Rimanelli on Dash Snow at the Brant Foundation Art Study Center, Greenwich, Connecticut
MALEREI MALGRÉ TOUT / Maria Muhle über „Painting 2.0“ im Museum Brandhorst, ­München
PUNK’S NOT DEAD, JUST DIFFERENT / Gili Tal on “Rum, sodomy, and the lash” at Eden Eden, Berlin
WITHIN YOU WITHOUT YOU / Jenny Nachtigall on Carolee Schneemann at Museum der Moderne, Salzburg
FREMDE ZUNGEN / Yilmaz Dziewior über „Slip of the Tongue“ in der Punta della Dogana, Venedig
LOCAL UNION / Rhea Anastas on Union Gaucha Productions at Artists Space, New York

EDITION

THEA DJORDJADZE
DANA SCHUTZ

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