John Divola

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John Divola

Published on the occasion of Los Angeles artist John Divola’s solo show at Gallery Min, Tokyo, June 13 – July 7, 1987, this very uncommon Japanese book features reproductions of many of his famous photographic works, including a large portion dedicated to his “Zuma” series of works. Includes an introductory essay by Mark Johnstone (in Japanese and English), a brief biography, exhibition history and bibliography (in English).

Designed by Hideyuki Taguchi and printed in Japan.

John Divola (born 1949, Los Angeles) is a contemporary visual artist. He currently lives and works in Riverside, CA. Divola works in photography, describing himself as exploring the landscape by looking for the edge between the abstract and the specific.

In “Zuma” project, he has described being interested in the relation between real artworks and representations of them, and the issues of the natural and the artificial. Divola said “I attempted … to develop a practice in which there could be no distinction between the document and the original.” In his series of photographs from 1977, he used deserted houses on Zuma Beach and covered their walls in graffiti photograph the ocean from the house’s interior through windows and cracks. Divola states: “On initially arriving I would move through the house looking for areas or situations to photograph. If nothing seemed to interest me I would move things around or do some spray painting. The painting was done in much the same way that one might doodle on a piece of paper. At that point I would return to the camera and explore what ever new potentials existed.” These cyclical images skillfully juxtapose romantic skies and sunsets with a seaside structure that, frame by frame, deteriorates into ruin as it is vandalized by the artist and others who eventually set it on fire”. Divola works trace a schematic desire for escape, movement and transcendence.

“My acts, my painting, my photographing, my considering, are part of, not separate from, this process of evolution and change. These photographs are not so much about this process as they are remnants from it. My participation was not so much one of intellectual consideration as one of visceral involvement.” John Divola, 1980.

* Condition: Very Good (a tight, clean copy) – All care is taken to provide accurate condition details of used books, photos available on request.

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John Divola (1987)
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Kaleidoscope #27
Summer 2016 (Sterling Ruby)


Kaleidoscope #27 (Summer 2016) is issue is a key to enter the world of Los Angeles-based artist Sterling Ruby, exclusively playing the double role of subject and guest editor. Conceived as a viral, aggressive takeover of the magazine’s architecture, content and design, this hyper-vertical survey is the result of an intense dialogue with the artist and his studio, comprised of 160+ pages on his exuberant work and vision.

Ruby’s cover portrait is drawn from an extensive series shot by photographer Max Farago at the artist’s massive industrial studio space in LA. Inside, the Sterling Ruby Takeover decodes the artist’s grammar through an intimate conversation with artist Piero Golia and newly commissioned writings by Alex Gartenfeld, Donatien Grau, Aram Moshayedi, Ross Simonini, Paul Schimmel and Catherine Taft; while his network of influences is explored through a series of guest features dedicated to his peers, heroes and collaborators, including Huma Bhabha (by Massimiliano Gioni), Cassils (by Francesca Gavin), Mike Davis (by Sterling Ruby), John Divola (by Alexander Shulan), Cyprien Gaillard (by Natalia Valencia Arango), Ron Nagle (by Sterling Ruby), Nancy Rubins (by Sterling Ruby), Raf Simons (by Alessio Ascari) and Melanie Schiff (by Sarah Workneh). All of this content is punctuated by stunning visual contributions especially created by Ruby for the magazine’s pages, comprising an unseen presentation of his Work Wear modeled by the entire studio team.

Born in 1972 on an American air force base in Germany, raised in rural Pennsylvania, trained in Chicago, Ruby moved to LA to finish his education, became Mike Kelley’s teaching assistant and quickly one of the city’s quintessential artists. Now 44, he runs a megastudio with a staff of over twenty under the big black sun. Complex to label in his unapologetic combination of compulsion and strategy, bigness and poetry, handcraft and seriality, darkness and psychedelia, hard and soft, Ruby is one of the most unique and controversial voices on the art scene, working incessantly across the most diverse media and platforms and stretching the limits of visual language. This hybrid editorial experiment coincides with the artist’s major show at the Belvedere/Winterpalais in Vienna and participation in the “Made in LA“ biennial at Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

Running independent from the takeover, the opening section of HIGHLIGHTS and the closing section of REGULARS complete the issue with a rich and varied selection of the best of the summer season and insightful contributions from our columnists and correspondents around the globe.

HIGHLIGHTS features profiles on Sean Raspet (by Franklin Melendez), Kienholz (by Gianni Jetzer), Marguerite Humeau (by Nadim Samman), Eckhaus Latta (by Chloe Wilcox), Sol Calero (by George Vasey), Renaud Jerez (by Tina Kukielski), Christopher Y. Lew (by Julia Trotta), Yngve Holen (by Cristina Travaglini), Home Economics (by Attilia Fattori Franchini), Valerie Keane (by Allison Bulger), Cao Fei (by Xin Wang) and Megan Rooney (by Harry Burke).

In the REGULARS section, “Producers” features Carson Chan in conversation with New York-based collective DIS; in “Futura 89+,” Hans Ulrich Obrist and Simon Castets (with Katherine Dionysius) interview young Portuguese artist Bruno Zhu; Fiona Duncan reflects on the figure of the go-go dancer in contemporary art and culture as part of her “Pro/Creative” column; in “Renaissance Man,” Jeffrey Deitch discusses the collaboration between artist Alex Israel and writer Bret Easton Ellis; Maria Lind’s “Centerstage” presents Danish artist Marie Kölbaek-Iversen; Gean Moreno unveils Cuba’s new normal for “Panorama”; in “Pioneers,” Fredi Fischli and Niels Olsen talk to Heimo Zobernig; and lastly, as part of the “What’s Next” series, we look forward to the season with collector and curator Tiffany Zabludowicz.

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Kaleidoscope #27 (Summer 2016 Sterling Ruby)
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Ordinary Pictures


Despite its apparent throwaway status, the stock image comprises the primary commodity of a billion-dollar global industry with far-reaching effects in the marketplace and the public sphere. Taking this overlooked facet of contemporary life as a point of departure, “Ordinary Pictures” explores the photographic apparatuses and commercial interests that have given rise to our generic image culture through the conceptual image-based work of some 40 artists, including John Baldessari, Steven Baldi, Sarah Charlesworth, Anne Collier, Liz Deschenes, John Divola, Aleksandra Domanovi c, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Morgan Fisher, Hollis Frampton, Jack Goldstein, Rachel Harrison, Robert Heinecken, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Louise Lawler, Sherrie Levine, Steve McQueen, Jack Pierson, Peter Piller, Seth Price, Amanda Rossotto, Ed Ruscha, Steven Shore, Sturtevant, Mungo Thomson, Wolfgang Tillmans, Tseng Kwong Chi, Julia Wachtel and Christopher Williams. Spanning generations, movements and artistic strategies from the 1960s to the present day, this publication brings together works by artists who have probed, mimicked and critiqued this aspect of our visual environment as well as its industrial modes of production and distribution. Through the work of these artists and a series of scholarly essays, the catalogue aims to examine different operations of the generic image in culture, namely its anonymous circulation and editorial uses, its adaptability and reproducibility, its technical processes of production, its claim to copyright and artistic license and its tendency toward abstraction. Featuring a unique, coil-bound design reminiscent of stock photo catalogues and a flexidisc recording by the artist Jack Goldstein, this highly collectible book ultimately reflects on contemporary art’s own complicit function as an expanding industrial image economy.

Edited by Eric Crosby, texts by Lane Relyea and Thomas Beard.

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Ordinary Pictures
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Kaleidoscope 10
Spring 2011

Kaleidoscope 10 – Spring 2011

Kaleidoscope is an international quarterly of contemporary art and culture. Distributed worldwide on a seasonal basis, it offers a timely guide to the present (but also to the past and possible futures) with an interdisciplinary and unconventional approach.

HIGHLIGHTS
Michael E. Smith by Chris Sharp; Jean-Léon Gérome by Marie de Brugerolle; Kathryn Andrews by Michael Ned Holte; Criticism as Fiction? by Vincenzo Latronico; John Divola by Chris Wiley.

MAIN THEME – Art Faces the Economy
Superflex by Marina Vishmidt; Charles Esche and Maria Lind in conversation; Current Account by Nav Haq; Zachary Formwalt by Binna Choi

MONO – Haegue Yang
Essay by Bart van der Heide; Focus by Joanna Fiduccia; Special project by Haegue Yang; Interview by Yasmil Raymond.

REGULARS
Pionners: Absalon by Simone Menegoi; Futura: Raumlabor by Hans Ulrich Obrist; Mapping the Studio: Heimo Zobernig by Luca Cerizza; Vis à vis: Leigh Ledare and Hilary Lloyd by Elena Filipovic; Critical Space: Chantal Mouffe by Markus Miessen; Last Question by Alessandro Pessoli.

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Kaleidoscope 10
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