Ken Okiishi

UnderTheClouds-coverUnderTheCloudsspread

Under the Clouds: from Paranoia to the Digital Sublime
João Ribas (ed.)


Since the second half of the 20th century, we have lived under the shadow of two clouds: the mushroom cloud of the atomic bomb, and the ‘cloud’ of distributed information networks. How did the central metaphor of cold war paranoia become the utopian metaphor of today? ‘Under the Clouds’ explores the contemporary sublime that has replaced the natural one, and the interrelated effects and affects of these two clouds on life and work, leisure and love, and on images, bodies, and minds.
The post-war technologies of the emergent third industrial revolution have now evolved to fit in the palm of our hand; we no longer merely look at images, we now touch, scroll, pinch, and drag them. Where is the border between the self and its data shadow, between information, matter, and affect? The biological, economic, aesthetic, and political effects of living under the clouds has taken the form of new relations between data and material, as well as increasing debt and abstract financialization; the changing nature of work and sex; and new relationships between screens, images, and things. As earlier forms of technologically inflected art sought to mitigate the effects of change — both on perception and society — many of today’s artistic practices confront the myriad interfaces and decentralized networks that continue to shape and transform daily life, forming new evolving connections between bits and atoms.

Texts by
Enrico Baj & Sergio Dangelo, Thomas Hirschhorn, Sean Landers, Metahaven, Seth Price, João Ribas, Frances Stark, Hito Steyerl, Stan VanDerBeek

Artists
Adel Abdessemed, Horst Ademeit, Cory Arcangel, Arte Nucleare, Darren Bader, Enrico Baj, Robert Barry, Eduardo Batarda, Thomas Bayrle, Neïl Beloufa, René Bertholo, Joseph Beuys, K.P. Brehmer, Bruce Conner, Kate Cooper, Gregory Corso, Guy Debord, Harun Farocki, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Carla Filipe, General Idea, Melanie Gilligan, Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville, Peter Halley, Rachel Harrison, Mona Hatoum, Pedro Henriques, Thomas Hirschhorn, Yves Klein, Sean Landers, Elad Lassry, Mark Lombardi, Julie Mehretu, Katja Novitskova, Ken Okiishi, Trevor Paglen, Nam June Paik, Silvestre Pestana, Pratchaya Phinthong, Seth Price, Martha Rosler, Thomas Ruff, Jacolby Satterwhite, Ângelo de Sousa, Frances Stark, Haim Steinbach, Hito Steyerl, Jean Tinguely, Adelhyd van Bender, Stan VanDerBeek, Andy Warhol, Christopher Williams, Christopher Wool, Anicka Yi

Description
Under the Clouds: from Paranoia to the Digital Sublime
Product Options
#OptionPriceStock
1-$58.001
Shipping
Shipping Rate: D
Order Under the Clouds: from Paranoia to the Digital Sublime - @ $58.00
MORE...
Text-zur-Kunst-100-coverText-zur-Kunst-100-spread

TEXTE ZUR KUNST #100
December 2015 "The Canon"


ISSUE NO. 100
DECEMBER 2015
„THE CANON“

“Our 100th issue is dedicated to the question of the “canon.” We take up this theme with an interest in reflecting on the journal’s own role in the field of contemporary art — one that, when first initiated in 1990, was markedly counter-canonical, vigorously contesting certain methods of critique while supporting others. And yet, we pause here to acknowledge that after 25 years, we have also doubtlessly played a crucial part in shaping a particular discourse, even normativizing it to some degree. Could it even be said that TzK has established a canon in its own right? With this issue, we now take stock of what TzK’s relationship to the canon might be, and moreover, what the notion of canonicity in 2015 might now represent.”

– Texte Zur Kunst

ISSUE NO. 100 / DECEMBER 2015 “THE CANON”

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACE

TOM HOLERT
IN PRAISE OF PRESUMPTUOUSNESS: “KANON-POLITIK ” (1992) REVISITED

DIEDRICH DIEDERICHSEN
MIKE KELLEY

SABETH BUCHMANN
MEDIAL (SELF-)MOVEMENT

ISABELLE GRAW
CANON AND CRITIQUE: AN INTERPLAY / Heimo Zobernig

JULIANE REBENTISCH
25 ARTISTS FROM 1990 TO 2015 / And 25 reasons why each belongs in the Texte zur Kunst canon

GERTRUD KOCH
POLYPHONY OR DISSONANCE / Are there artists lost in the canon?

KERSTIN STAKEMEIER
MORE MANNERISM / Ruth May and Jan Molzberger

GUNTER RESKI
EMBEDDED NUDES / Arno Rink

ALEXANDER GARCÍA DÜTTMANN
OLD WOMEN / Maria Lassnig’s “Du oder ich” (You or me), 2005

BEATE SÖNTGEN
ROSEMARIE TROCKEL

NICK MAUSS
IAN WHITE

TESS EDMONSON
DIS

HANNA MAGAUER
POST-INTERNET: THE NEW ORDER

JOSEPHINE PRYDE
THE INDIVIDUAL

CAROLINE BUSTA
BAD CANON

SIMON DENNY
DISRUPT

KEN OKIISHI
CITIZENSHIP

VALENTINA LIERNUR
SELF-REFLECTIVE SUBJECTS

JUTTA KOETHER
FIGURE OF PAINT: ON THE INCONTROVERTIBLE!

ALICE CREISCHER AND ANDREAS SIEKMANN
TUCUMÁN ARDE

PAMELA M. LEE
GROUP MATERIAL

FELIX VOGEL
MARTIN BECK

SVEN BECKSTETTE
STURTEVANT

CLAIRE FONTAINE
TOWARD A CANONIC FREEDOM

SVEN LÜTTICKEN
FALLING APART, TOGETHER

ROBERT KULISEK AND DAVID LIESKE
HUSBANDS HAVE GOT TO DIE! / A conversation about Taryn Simon

BRIGITTE WEINGART
GREAT & SMALL

HELMUT DRAXLER
CANON OF EXISTENCE, ETHICS OF THE BREAK

ROTATION

ELECTROCONVULSIVE LIT / John Kelsey on Sylvère Lotringer’s “Mad Like Artaud”

REVIEWS

VERWISCHTE GRENZEN / Robert Müller über „Radikal Modern. Planen und Bauen im Berlin der 1960er-Jahre“ in der Berlinischen Galerie

AGING INTO NEW WORLDS: DEUTSCH-AMERIKANISCHE FREUNDSCHAFT / Bettina Funcke surveys five fall 2015 shows in New York

ANGEWANDTER HISTOMAT / Ariane Müller über „to expose, to show, to demonstrate, to inform, to offer. Künstlerische Praktiken um 1990“ im Mumok, Wien

ENIGMA IN THE MIRROR / Luis Felipe Fabre on “In Girum Imus Nocte et Consumimur Igni” at Museo Jumex, Mexico City

WHERE ANGELS FEAR TO TREAD / Nuit Banai on R. H. Quaytman at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art

IST KUNST EIN SEXUALPROBLEM? / Eva Birkenstock über Lea Lublin im Lenbachhaus, München

HERE’S NOT HERE / Damon Sfetsios and Elise Duryee-Browner on Stephan Dillemuth at Reena Spaulings Fine Art, New York

WEAK LOCAL LINEAMENTS / Gareth James on Sam Lewitt at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts, San Francisco

OBITUARIES

PETER SCHEIFFELE (1971–2015)
by Ilka Becker
CHANTAL AKERMAN (1950–2015)
by Tim Griffin

EDITION

JOHN BALDESSARI
NHU DUONG
PETER FISCHLI/DAVID WEISS
WADE GUYTON
RACHEL HARRISON
SARAH MORRIS
ALBERT OEHLEN
RICHARD PHILLIPS
SETH PRICE
GERHARD RICHTER
ROSEMARIE TROCKEL

Description
TEXTE ZUR KUNST #100 THE CANON
Product Options
#OptionPriceStock
1-$29.002
Shipping
Shipping Rate: B
Order TEXTE ZUR KUNST #100 THE CANON - @ $29.00
MORE...
Mousse-47-spread

Mousse #48

In this issue:

Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Art and Literature, Darja Bajagić, Walter Dahn, Fiction in Reality, Have We Become the Internet?, Lynn Hershman Leeson, The History of Exhibitions, Intimacy in Art, Nicholas Mangan, Park McArthur, The Multiplication of Moving Perspectives, Opening up to the Unexpected, Philippe Parreno and Paul B. Preciado, Systems Prosthetics, Time as Material, The Withdrawal of the Artist, Betty Woodman, Steina and Woody Vasulka.

Driven by the energy of art writing and artists’ writing, contemporary literature seems to be consciously migrating into the art world. Some artists exist halfway between the two worlds and are evolving the most innovative characteristics of the literary canon. Brian Dillon attempts to analyze this type of writing, its practice and its potential.

Philippe Parreno and Paul B. Preciado, a philosopher, writer and activist at the helm of the Independent Studies Program of the MACBA, raise ground-breaking questions ranging from the coercion of the public by the institution to processes of disidentification from dominant sexual identities, in a conversation conducted by Hans Ulrich Obrist.

Starting in the 1990s, the history of exhibitions has taken on greater resonance in art writing. One precursor of this fundamental type of research was Bruce Altshuler, with his The Avant-Garde in Exhibition. Altshuler, Jens Hoffmann and Elena Filipovic engage in an extensive conversation on the history of exhibitions and the role artists have in organizing them.

Chus Martínez analyzes the beauty of an ecology of events of little interest for the market, but driven by an energy that might pressure the system to open to the unexpected, to balance out the impulse to guarantee results before any attempts have been made to break new ground.

The work of Lawrence Abu Hamdan reveals how the forensic linguistics applied to test the accents of political asylum applicants is often unreliable, on a par with the many audio charlatans hired to ascertain the origins of individuals. The artist discusses all this with Mihnea Mircan.

Youthful transgressions, previously fueled by romantic literature, have been transformed into desire for extreme self-assertion modeled on “first-person-shooter” video games and action movies. Ingo Niermann wonders about how it might be possible to reverse this trend, through the introduction of a positive kind of transgression.

What does it mean to be human in the light of increasingly pervasive technological developments? Omar Kholeif moderates a conversation between Constant Dullaart, Zach Blas and James Bridle, artists who have reflected at length on the impact of the integration of software and algorithms on everyday life.

Michael Wang explores the aesthetics of an art that actively engages with different systems, and the perspective of artists as they consider the objectives, limits and structure of a work that is no longer a matter of objects, but nimbly moves through the folds of these systems as energy.

A handful of artists over the last 50 years have “self-absconded” from the public eye and the social whirl of the system. Martin Herbert discreetly tracks several of them to formulate a hypothesis that reflects an increasing schism between the needs of artists and those of the art world.

Lynn Hershman Leeson’s work is an incessant exploration of the nature of consciousness and its extension via technology. Kathy Noble gives an exhaustive overview of her versatile output, from the early pieces to films on identity, cloning and feminist politics featuring Tilda Swinton.

Confession in art can lead to works plagued by egocentric attitude or can bring results of genuine “alongsideness,” where the social becomes visible without recourse to reconstruction. Lauren Cornell and Johanna Burton analyze works and artists that have been able to make critical use of intimacy.

Nice to Meet You:
The theme of access and the tensions involved in its possibility are the fulcrum of Park McArthur’s production and the focus of this interview with Daniel S. Palmer.

Natalia Sielewicz talks to Darja Bajagić whose work recontextualizes saucy images seen as stereotypes by Western eyes, granting them a sort of liberating ambiguity.

Steina and Woody Vasulka are leading exponents of the video experimentation that began in the late 1960s. Elyse Mallouk analyzes their works from various decades in the light of our growing relationship with the inorganic systems that nurture our relationships of feedback.

Joan Jonas, Ken Okiishi, Jennifer West, and Lucy Raven meet on the common ground of work located at the intersection between visual arts, moving image and performance. In a conversation introduced and moderated by Filipa Ramos they share their ideas and discuss their practice and its relation to time, history, popular culture, theater and narrative.

Australian artist Nicholas Mangan talks to Mariana Cánepa Luna about his work that investigates the troubled relationship between man and the natural environment, and analyzes contexts and objects capable of freeing up narratives that take stock of reality.

Andrew Berardini visits the big clay-dusted studio-vase of Betty Woodman. Her chubby ceramic odalisques, with their alluring forms, covered with fragments of precious stones, embroideries and miniatures, tug him into a grand theater of forms and colors, wild things and aquatic creatures.

Walter Dahn indicated a path for art after conceptualism with his new way of thinking about painting. Daniel Schreiber met with the artist in his home in Cologne to talk about the artist’s story and recent works, a series of silkscreens linked to the revolutionary power of music.

After the linear perspective of the Renaissance, new perspectives have been explored, starting with chronophotography and the overturning of vertical or bird’s-eye perspective. Jennifer Allen investigates these various perspectives in relation to a number of contemporary artists who have reached multiple, mobile and fragmented visions.

The Artist as Curator
Issue #6 an insert in Mousse Magazine #47
Mel Bochner, Working Drawings And Other Visible Things On Paper Not Necessarily Meant To Be Viewed As Art, 1966
Hank Bull, Shen Fan, Zhou Tiehai, Shi Yong, and Ding Yi, Let’s Talk About Money: Shanghai First International Fax Art Exhibition, 1966

Description
Mousse #48
Product Options
#OptionPriceStock
1-$19.001
Shipping
Shipping Rate: D
Order Mousse #48 - @ $19.00
MORE...
okiishi-coverOkiishi-back

Ken Okiishi
The Very Quick of the Word


Ken Okiishi’s artwork has explored the subject in between digital and continuous space, the changing nature of authorship, memory, and perception, and the indeterminacy of consciousness as it clashes with the strictures of technology. He has engaged seminal works by figures including Woody Allen, Arthur Rimbaud, Marcel Duchamp, Stephen Spielberg, David Wojnarowicz, Jacques Demy, and Larry Clark (and the histories and personalities that circulate around these cultural products), infusing them with autobiographical and technological elements that reframe them through the incongruity of “real life.” While working on the exhibitions at MIT and CCS Bard that occasion this publication, Okiishi realized a radical material rupture in his work, as linguistic and bodily glitches became registered both inside andoutside the screen, and the surface of media itself became the support surface for weirdly gestural paintings. This series of works, titled gesture/data, was first exhibited at CCS Bard and, most recently, was exhibited to great acclaim at the 2014 Whitney Biennial. This book is the first instance of considering Okiishi’s work from the last fifteen years as a heterogeneous whole.

This publication takes the format of the exhibition catalogue—as a carrier for the circulation of texts and images—as a format in crisis. The physical book appears here as a dummy that is loaded with various files, many appearing as the glitchy in-between that we have become accustomed to as files load on so many different devices and scales of screens. Included in this mass of files is Annie Godfrey Larmon’s thesis on the work of Ken Okiishi (the first in-depth study of the artist’s work), a new text by Alise Upitis on computing and the conditions of translation, images from Okiishi’s series gesture/data (2013–ongoing), and a screenplay book of Okiishi’s 2010 runaway hit, (Goodbye to) Manhattan.

The Very Quick of the Word is published in conjunction with Ken Okiishi’s exhibitions at the MIT List Visual Arts Center (July 16–September 1, 2013) and the Hessel Museum of Art, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College (March 24–May 26, 2013).

Design by Ken Okiishi

Description
Ken Okiishi - The Very Quick of the Word
Product Options
#OptionPriceStock
1-$28.000
Shipping
Shipping Rate: C

Out of Stock

MORE...