Kirsten Pieroth

THE LULENNIAL: A SLIGHT GESTUARY

Fabiola Iza, Chris Sharp, eds.

Economy, “in the sense of doing a lot with a little or sometimes nothing at all,” is one of the founding principles of the Lulennial, a biennial organized by Fabiola Iza and Chris Sharp at Lulu, a 9-square meter independent space in Mexico City. The diminutive space is not necessarily a constraint if the works exhibited (and featured in this accompanying publication) are the startling outcome of slight gestures, like those created by Jirí Kovanda, Roman Ondák, Kirsten Pieroth, Wilfredo Prieto, and Martín Soto Climent, just to name some of the more than 25 participants in the exhibition. Other instigators of this peculiar attitude, the purpose of which is to achieve the maximum effect through the smallest of means, range from Billy Apple to Graciela Carnevale to Mierle Laderman Ukeles and La Monte Young, among others.

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THE LULENNIAL: A SLIGHT GESTUARY
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Poor Man’s Expression: Technology, Experimental Film, Conceptual Art A Compendium in Texts and Images
Martin Ebner, Florian Zeyfang (Eds.)

With texts by Sabeth Buchmann, Anselm Franke, Ariane Müller, Branden Joseph, Stefanie Schulte Strathaus, Ian White, Axel John Wieder

Poor Man’s Expression examines the relationship between film, video, technology, and art, with a particular focus on the reciprocal influences between conceptual art and experimental film. The publication is based on the eponymous exhibition in Berlin in 2006, but represents an independent compendium of texts and images beyond the show. Works, lectures and performances by international artists, created for the exhibition and expanded for the publication, are set alongside historical experimental films from the archive of the Freunde der Deutschen Kinemathek in Berlin. The authors and artists respond to the questions that arise as to the semantics of critical and experimental conceptual art, medial representation, and the expansion of a concept of technology towards social functions and psychology; they explore problems of medial control, intellectual property, and a changing concept of the public.

as a point of departure we have assumed that there was once a close relationship between forms that now exist rather separately, namely the realms of visual art, experimental film, literature, poetry, music – and very much the development of technology, too. what is it supposed to mean that 16mm projectors now occupy their luxurious final performance sites at art societies and galleries, while iphone youtube (without open source codecs, to be sure) is the current way to watch a hollis frampton interview.

the other way around, isn’t the gentle entry of the genre of “experimental film” into the realm of “media art” of the 1980s and 1990s itself a transformation analog to general social and medial development brought about by the development of individualization and consumer society? in poor man’s expression we have sought, through an advanced setting (“affirmative” neon light surfaces, and the exhibition’s “paradoxical” bipartite spatial principle) to address the surrounding “corporate public” architecture of the sony center as well as the film archive deep underground and the dark cinema space of the “avant-garde cinema.”

Artists: Stephanie Taylor, Sebestyén Kodolányi, Sebastian Lütgert, Henrik Olesen, Mathias Poledna, Sean Snyder, Daria Martin, Kirsten Pieroth, Martin Ebner, Florian Zeyfang

Images: Anthony Balch, Len Lye, Carolee Schneeman, Bruce Conner, Harry Smith, Joyce Wieland, George Landow, Marie Menken, Ken Jacobs, Rober Breer, Emile Cohl, a.o.

In collaboration with Arsenal Institute for Film and Video art

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Silberkuppe
Under One Umbrella

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Maps and Legends

 

For this pleasingly compact introduction to the wilder shores of contemporary European and American art, the BSI Art Collection in Geneva invited several writers, critics, artists and scientists–including Luca Cerizza, Joachim Koester, Helen Mirra and Hans Ulrich Obrist–to write responses to the works of artists held in its collection. The results, which range from the essayistic to outright fiction, make Maps and Legends an excellent example of the sheer scope of possible responses one can have to an artwork. Reproductions and installation shots of 11 artists–Franz Ackermann, Alighiero e Boetti, Marine Hugonnier, Joachim Koester, Deborah Ligorio, Jonathan Monk, Philippe Parreno, Kirsten Pieroth, Daniel Roth, Tomas Saraceno and Christopher Williams–make this book an informative read and a delightfully designed publication.

The book is published by the commissioner, BSI (Banca della Svizzera Italiana), as part of their Art Program, relaunched in 2005 by the Italian curator and critic Luca Cerizza. Stemming from a program of site-specific commissions for the bank, the books in this series are conceived as individual monographs and catalogues on each artist’s contribution. Gathering preparatory material, documentation on the works, and essays by critics or the artists themselves, these volumes contribute to the discussion around commissioning, the notions of public vs. private collection, and the relationship between artists and patrons.

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