Nina Beier

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What Ever Happened to New Institutionalism?
James Voorhies (Ed.)


Contributions by Martin Beck, Nina Beier, Silvia Benedito, Ulla von Brandenburg, Katarina Burin, Simon Dybbroe Møller, Jonas Ekeberg, Alex Farquharson, Fernanda Fragateiro, Simon Fujiwara, James Goggin, Tone Hansen, Owen Hatherley, Henriette Huldisch, Damon Krukowski, Le Corbusier, Maria Lind, Markus Miessen, Eline Mugaas, Elise Storsveen, Gloria Sutton, James Voorhies, Naomi Yang, Amy Yoes

New Institutionalism
, a mode of curating that originated in Europe in the 1990s, evolved from the legacy of international curator Harald Szeemann, the relational art advanced by French critic and theorist Nicolas Bourriaud, and other influential factors of the time. New Institutionalism’s dispersed and varied approaches to curating sought to reconfigure the art institution from within, reshaping it into an active, democratic, open, and egalitarian public sphere. These approaches posed other possibilities and futures for institutions and exhibitions, challenging the consensual conception, production, and distribution of art. Practitioners engaged the art institution with renewed confidence by imbuing it with the potential for new aesthetic experiences and different relationships among artists, institutions, and spectators beyond engrained modernist ideologies. Working in these new modes, the art institution could become a site of fluidity, unpredictability, and risk.

What Ever Happened to New Institutionalism? reflects upon the aspirations of these curatorial strategies and assesses their critical efficacy today within the landscape of contemporary art and globalized culture. The first in a series of readers examining changing characteristics of art institutions, this publication thinks through New Institutionalism by bringing together facsimiles of seminal texts, new critical essays, a history of trends and practices, and commissioned artist projects and contributions. These are complemented by documentation from the inaugural year of programming at the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts at Harvard University focused on reimagining CCVA as a twenty-first-century institution.

Copublished with Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts
Design by James Goggin, Practise

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Sculptures Also Die
Lorenzo Benedetti (Ed.)

Artists: Francesco Arena (Italy), Nina Beier (Denmark), Katinka Bock (Germany), Giorgio Calò Andreotta (Italy), Dario D’Aronco (Italy), N.Dash (USA), Michael Dean (UK), Oliver Laric (Austria), Mark Manders (Netherlands), Michael E. Smith (USA), Fernando Sánchez Castillo (Spain) and Francisco Tropa (Portugal), Oscar Tuazon (USA)

Edition of 1,000 copies

Produced by Palazzo Strozzi Foundation

Sculptures Also Die offers a reflection on contemporary sculpture curated by Lorenzo Benedetti through new and existing work by twelve Italian and international artists who will be forging a reflection on the meaning, the potential and the New Experimental Approaches in sculpture today. Contemporary artists tend to use new forms and materials to address a broader timeSpan in on ongoing dialogue between the past and the future;yet at the sametime, the exhibition reflects on the way in Which today’s artists are so Rediscovering examined material as bronze, stone or ceramic, That Appeared to have been relegated to the Purely academic sphere.These materials are rediscovered and used in a conceptual manner to reflect on themes examined: such as the monument, the fragment, the way material wear over time, and the recovery of the recent modernist past.

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The Reluctant Narrator: A Survey of Narrative Practices Across Media
Ana Teixeira Pinto (Ed.)

Contributions by Erika Balsom, Sladja Blazan, Kerstin Stakemeier, Ana Teixeira Pinto

Often referred to as the “narrative turn,” an explosion of interest in narrative practices at the end of the twentieth century was predicated on the notion that life itself is storied, or—as Jacques Ranciére put it—that the real must be fictionalized in order to be thought. Postmodernism itself was described as a “narrative turn” in which a rekindled interest in the fictive, the chronicle, and the anecdotal upstaged the symbolic unity of high modernism. But as Susan Buck-Morss has noted, modernism and postmodernism are not historical moments, they are political positions: two poles of a recurring movement, expressing the contradictions inherent to the industrial mode of production in the identity and nonidentity between social function and aesthetic form. Rather than opposing a myriad of micro-narratives to the grand narrative of modernism, The Reluctant Narrator attempts to map the migration of narrative modes across several media, bringing together works that intertwine personal biography with historical events, or that deal with stories that fell through the crevices of history.

Copublished with Museu Coleção Berardo, Lisbon, on the occasion of the exhibition “The Reluctant Narrator” (October 15, 2014–January 11, 2015) with works by Julieta Aranda, Armando Andrade Tudela, Leonor Antunes, Kader Attia, Nina Beier, Derek Boshier, Aleksandra Domanović, Dani Gal, Karl Holmqvist, Christoph Keller, David Levine, Amalia Pica, Bojan Šarčević, John Smith, Hito Steyerl, Stephen Sutcliffe, Andreas Töpfer, Gernot Wieland.

A Portuguese edition is available from Museu Coleção Berardo, Lisbon.

Design by Andreas Koch

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Kaleidoscope 12
Fall 2011

Kaleidoscope #12 – Fall 2011

Kaleidoscope is an international quarterly of contemporary art and culture. Distributed worldwide on a seasonal basis, it offers a timely guide to the present (but also to the past and possible futures) with an interdisciplinary and unconventional approach.

HIGHLIGHTS: Public Movement interview by Alhena Katsof; RON NAGLE INTERVIEW BY STERLING RUBY; Lucie Stahl by Joanna Fiduccia; The Suburbs by Michele D’Aurizio; Uri Aran by Bartholomew Ryan.

MAIN THEME: STATE OF THE ART BOOK: EXPERIMENTAL COLLECTIBLE LIONEL BOVIER AND AA BRONSON IN CONVERSATION; Why the Book? by Chris Sharp; Special Project by Nina Beier; Secondary into Primary
‘c5bäke and Gavin Wade in conversation; Archive Fever Chris Decon interviewed by Florencia Serrot.

MONO: BERNADETTE CORPORATION: I Can’t Go On, I’ll Go On words by Chris Wiley; Matter Expands Away by Vincenzo Latronico; IF EVERYTHING WORKS INTERVIEW BY ANNIE OCHMANEK; Special Project by Bernadette Corporation.

COLUMNS: PIONEERS: Hannah Wilke by Simone Menegoi; FUTURA: David Hominal interview by Hans Ulrich Obrist; MAPPING THE STUDIO: Louise Hervé & Chloé Maillet by Luca Cerizza; ON EXHIBITION: “Carlo Mollino. Maniera Moderna” by Paola Nicolin; LAST QUESTION: What Is Going on out in the Street? answer by Ari Marcopoulos.

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