Phillip Zach

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Art Against Art
Issue #2

EDITORIAL

When considering the art field as being a raft in speculative time, the tendency is to seek comfort in numbers, regressive ideas such as another return to painting[1] or hedging bets on all sides whilst pursuing an unreasonable personal growth fetish.

These are classic reactions to a perceived risk that arises as a result of readjusting to new data. Uncertainty, if left unmediated, will pose a risk not just to market stability but to conceptual stability as it becomes more and more difficult to differentiate between artists and ads; artworks and hype-objects; or content and sponsored content – keeping us in a state of high drama too complex to decode. For example artists who consciously use marketing strategies as art are contextually mixed up with masses of artists who simply run a marketing strategy. Or, equally, galleries with a reputation for long-term quality regularly use their weight to inflate very short-lived speculative art. It is in these differences that art barters itself off very quickly to sometimes uninteresting effects holding us in a certain inappropriate narrative if we are not careful.

Up until a hundred years ago, it was normal to assume that all art aimed at “beauty” or varying degrees of “representation” and that anything but, would not be considered art. Later, after The Fountain, this evolved into the politics of mass production leading to whatever fallacy that we have today – perhaps a speculative bias targeted at an erroneously projected future consensus. It may be worth considering ditching all retroactive rhetoric about “safe places” in favor of heightening one’s own form of perception (perhaps even through enhancement), to adapt to the new environment and to filter through informational debris.

Inside the art world […]

The Editors

CONTENTS

Editorial

Kenny Schachter – Art After the Apocalypse

Linda Yablonsky – Plus Ça Change

A Conversation with Michael Gross – Quid pro Quo – How the sausage gets made at the Met

Joseph Walsh – An Image that is Nothing to be Desired

Image spread by Natasha Vita-More

Paul Mason – Eleven Theses on Postcapitalist Art

Christian J. Haye – More Art

Casey Jane Ellison – 2 Ones Chat and Then End

Armen Avanessian – Present Tension: Notes on Preemption, Hyperstition,
Contemporary Art and the Post-Contemporary Condition

Artist edition by Phillip Zach

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Art in the Periphery of the Center
Christoph Behnke, Cornelia Kastelan, Valérie Knoll, Ulf Wuggenig (Eds.)



Contributions by Marie-Luise Angerer, Christoph Behnke, Ana Bogdanović, Larissa Buchholz, Sabeth Buchmann, Kathrin Busch, Bettina von Dziembowski, Daniel Falb, Paul Feigelfeld, Ulrike Gerhardt, Monica Greco, Erich Hörl, Cornelia Kastelan, Stefanie Kleefeld, Valérie Knoll, Roman Kräussl, Susanne Leeb, Hannes Loichinger, Sven Lütticken, Julia Moritz, Volker Pekron, Pierre Pénet, Dieter Roelstraete, Bettina Roggmann, Stefan Römer, Steffen Rudolph, Michael Sanchez, Magnus Schaefer, Stefanie Sembill, Christophe Spaenjers, Paul Stenner, Jeannine Tang, Olav Velthuis, Ulf Wuggenig

Peripheries are profoundly ambiguous regions. While trying to build a relationship with the center, the periphery often finds itself excluded both on a structural and actor-related level, no matter if the center-periphery model is defined in terms of space or along relations of power. However, beyond static perspectives of such struggles, in a dynamic and globalized artistic field increasingly transformed by the digital revolution, temporary mobility attractors deserve our attention.

This publication attempts to shift practices of thought toward both critical realism and new materialism. It is neither committed to today’s wishful thinking regarding horizontalized networks and deterritorialized structures, nor does it fix itself to determinist approaches. In contrast to twentieth-century constructivist approaches and their epistemic fallacies, materialized verticalities and matter-based, infrastructural spaces are brought to the fore.

This book is the result of four years of collaborative work that focused on topics of affect, the return of history, ecology, and art and its markets in today’s power law–based economies. These themes triggered not only the development of new artworks but also gave rise to reflexive discourses and discussions surrounding art theory, philosophy, sociology, and economics. The book contains a visual documentation of a number of group shows—which also included the works of winners of the Daniel Frese Prize—at Agathenburg Castle, Halle für Kunst Lüneburg, Kunstraum of Leuphana University of Lüneburg, and Kunstverein Springhornhof. The contributions by critics, curators, theoreticians, and scientists include essays and in-depth conversations.

Works by Art Club 2000, Patterson Beckwith, J. St. Bernard, Angela Bulloch, Daniel Buren, Merlin Carpenter, Gordon Castellane, Diego Castro, Nicolas Ceccaldi, Jeremiah Day, Stephan Dillemuth, John Dogg, Maria Eichhorn, Jana Euler, Loretta Fahrenholz, Renée Green, Karl Holmqvist, Gilta Jansen, Monika Jarecka, Tobias Kaspar, Carola Keitel, Jackie McAllister, Josephine Meckseper, Dirk Meinzer, James Meyer, Shana Moulton, nOffice, Christodoulos Panayiotou, Fabian Reimann, Carissa Rodriguez, Megan Francis Sullivan, Katja Staats, Simon Starling, Buffy Summers, Jan Timme, Daniela Töbelmann, Niko Wolf, Amelie von Wulffen, Phillip Zach

Copublished with Leuphana University of Lüneburg
Design and infographics by Sina Hurnik and Kerstin Warncke

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