Tag: 3-Ply

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Re-print #3: I Have No Time (1983 [1979])
Mladen Stilinović

“Despite Mladen’s instruction to read this book when I have no time, when I am very busy, I first ‘properly’ read I have no time when I had a lot of time, while lying in bed in a hospital in the early 1990s. It was then that I began to understand that this small book was more than some small joke. I have no time, I have no time, I have no time… is for me a kind of mantra, to stop and think about what and why I am doing something, anything…Paradoxically the pursuit of laziness requires an active engagement in stealing back time. That activity becomes harder and harder when time seems to accelerate and is consumed by an endless quota of daily tasks (even supposedly art associated) and so this little book, first hand-written in 1978, becomes more and more important (to read properly) through time, especially when you are very busy…”
— Kerrie Poliness, Re-print #3: I Have No Time (1983 [1979])

The Re-print project is a curated series that reintroduces out-of-print artist publications to a contemporary audience. The series also exploits the character of the reprints to insert interventions in public archives: introducing material that was never legally deposited, or reinserting previously archived publications in the form of mediated replications, thereby indexing the originals.

The book selected for Re-print #3 is Nemam vremena (1979) [I Have No Time (1979)] (1983) by Mladen Stilinović. The 1983 version was offset printed by Edition Dacic, Tubingen, in an edition of 150 copies. The specific book scanned for this Re-print was loaned from the collection of artist John Nixon.

Nemam vremena (1979) [I Have No Time (1979)] was the first printed version of ‘I Have No Time’, and was an Artist’s Edition, 70 copies. It was offset printed in Zagreb, seven sheets, softcover, stapled, 17.5 x 13.5 cm.

Nemam vremena (1978) [I Have No Time (1978)] was the original version of ‘I Have No Time’. It was handwritten by Mladen Stilinović in pencil on paper, nine sheets (four written on), cardboard covers, stapled, 17 x 24 cm.

Mladen Stilinović (April 10, 1947 – July 18, 2016) was a Croatian conceptual artist. He was one of the leading figures of the so-called “New Art Practice” in Croatia and a founding member of the informal neo-avantgarde, Group of Six Artists (1975-1979), together with Vladimir Martek, Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Sven Stilinović and Fedomir Vučemilović. He lived and worked in Zagreb, Croatia.

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124,908
Tara McDowell (Ed.)

124,908 by Tara McDowell, with photography by Daro Sulakauri, experiments with how to document exhibitions in an embodied way. It deals with an exhibition that unfolded throughout the postindustrial city of Rustavi in the Republic of Georgia, in conjunction with the 2nd Tbilisi Triennial. The exhibition was titled for Rustavi’s population – 124,908 – and featured works by Xin Cheng, Leone Contini, Eliza Dyball, Clementine Edwards, George Egerton-Warburton, Cevdet Erek, Debris Facility, Emma Fitts, Amy Franceschini, Helen Grogan, Susan Jacobs, Ash Kilmartin, Ieva Misevičiūtė, Virginia Overell, and Kateřina Šedá. Echoing the model of Lucy R. Lippard’s numbers exhibitions from the early 1970s, Tara McDowell and assistant curator Nicholas Tammens invited artists to propose temporary artworks, which were installed in the city center, factory square, museum, theaters, pyramid and zoo, working with local artists, students, and Rustavi residents.

The images within the publication 124,908 were taken by photojournalist Daro Sulakauri over a single day (October 3, 2015) of the exhibition. The fragmented text that intersperses this image narrative reflects the fractured, time-skipping nature of the project’s composition. Lucy R. Lippard has reacted to the project as the “best understood account” of her numbers exhibitions, but 124,908 could also be characterised as facing the impossibilities of re-curation.

Design by Žiga Testen

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HEROES – Fanfiction (Centre for Style)
Fayen d’Evie, Matthew Linde, Spencer Lai, Jake Swinson (Eds.)

Edited by Fayen d’Evie, Matthew Linde, Spencer Lai and Jake Swinson
Design by Toby Tam

Contents include a feature text “The Banquet” by Monicas’s Gallery with Jessie Kiely, and image contributions from: Adam Wood, Anna-Sophie Berger, Aurelia Guo, Brendan Morris, Bror August, Caley Feeney, Chloé Elizabeth Maratta, Claire Barrow, D&K, Dara Allen, Eric Mack, Galen Erickson thanks to Matthew Drury, Callum Hawke, Oscar Khan and Arthur Marie, George Egerton-Warbuton, Giovanna Flores, Grace Anderson, H.B. Peace, Hamishi Farah, Hana Earles, Harry Burke, Jake Levy, Jessie Kiely, Joseph Geagan, Josey Kidd-Crowe, Kate Meakin, Kulisek-Lieske, Laura Fanning, Matty Bovan, Mel Paget, Milo Conroy, Misty Pollen, Nora Slade and Peter Guffield Linden, Rafael Delacruz, Rare Candy, Richard Malone,Ruth O’Leary, Ryohei Kawanishi, Sasha Geyer, Shahan Assadourian, Sophie Hardeman, Spencer Lai, Stefan Schwartzman, and Wiley Guillot.

Initiated by 3-ply and Centre for Style, HEROES conflates the artist book and the fashion magazine. The ‘hero look’ is a term used to describe the penultimate outfit of a designer’s collection. Often the most conceptually-driven moment of the runway, the hero outfit serves as a signpost for a designer’s signature style, not quotidian wearability. For this inaugural issue of HEROES, contributors were invited to approach the act of fashion design as a narrative of fanfiction, identifying as readers and fans of their own canon to generate a character or caricature of their personal style. With timeframes restricted to a day, techniques of assemblage and improvisation were privileged, as contributors constructed visceral manifestations of subjectivity through self-fashioned hero looks.

HEROES/Fanfiction includes a feature text “The Banquet” written by Monica’s Gallery with Jessie Kiely, that opens: “ACT I. It was within the candle-lit caverns beneath the wondrous castle bestowed upon The Fat Baron Oörif that the banquet took place. The air thick with magic…” Appropriating the fanfiction trope as a codified lookbook, the text weaves elaborate descriptions of characters and fantastical sub-plots, over the course of a banquet hosted for fifteen guests by a former trade tycoon, within his castle of soft provincial feel. Spiralling through philosophical, intersubjective and social commentary, this parallel universe lookbook interlaces acute reflections on meta-trends, personal freedoms and nested human artefacts.

Edition of 1000

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Re-print #2: Shanghai Fax (1996)
“Let’s Talk About Money”

In 1996, Vancouver-based artist Hank Bull collaborated with Shanghai-based artists Shi Yong, Ding Yi, Shen Fan and Zhou Tiehai in the production of a staple-bound, photocopied catalogue, printed in an edition of 500, to accompany the exhibition Shanghai Fax, which took place in Hua Shan College of Art, March 15 – 25 1996.  Re-print #2: Shanghai Fax (1996) “Let’s Talk About Money” presents this catalogue in a 1:1 scale reprint.

The Re-print project is a curated series that reintroduces out-of-print artist publications to a contemporary audience. The series also exploits the character of the reprints to insert interventions in public archives: introducing material that was never legally deposited, or reinserting previously archived publications in the form of mediated replications, thereby indexing the originals.

Shanghai Fax, purportedly the first artist-organised international exhibition to be staged in China, took place in the underground bunker gallery of Hua Shan College of Art from March 15 – 25 1996, timed to coincide with the inaugural Shanghai biennale. Shanghai Fax coalesced an idiosyncratic survey of artistic commentaries, theologies, and personal politics concerning the global economy, its individual affects and its absurdities. It was a low-fi, artist-driven project that mobilised fax works from an unusual constellation of artists: a network of pioneering collaborators in experimental telecommunications art; stars of the nascent Chinese art market; lesser known artists who would later be heralded as the new vanguard of Chinese contemporary art; and a scattering of anonymous contributors and individuals outside the art sphere, including a local real estate agent, whose advertisements of properties currently for sale were diligently added to the exhibition.

For an emerging generation of Chinese artists, Shanghai Faxdismantled prevailing norms of state-proscribed exhibiting strategies (mechanisms for strategic cultural and commercial diplomacy), and empowered experimental artist-direction of curatorial, exhibition and collaboration frameworks. However, for many of the Chinese participants in Shanghai Fax, the exhibition would ultimately prove a rarity on their resumes, as commercial success (and for some, the demands to upscale production for the international circuit) eclipsed less lucrative, artist-networked projects.

Shanghai Fax occurred in an era predating the expansion of the internet in China, the global connectivity of smartphones and social media, the exposure of PRISM and other state-directed surveillance of personal communications, and the routine deployment of malware and Trojan apps designed to mask interference while reinforcing a re-centralisation of information control. Shanghai Fax thus warrants contemporary attention as a counterpoint to our present situation, as a case study of technologically facilitated, decentralised, direct artistic collaboration in an epoch when electronic communications stirred utopian ideals of unfettered, grassroots artistic agency. Since his early years of practice, Hank Bull had been deeply influenced by Robert Filliou’s theories of horizontal technologies. Through Shanghai Fax, Bull, Shi Yong, Ding Yi, Shen Fan and Zhou Tiehai successfully de-privileged both art-as-commodity and professional hierarchy, in favour of Filliou’s credo that “The most important work one can do as an artist to support the valid work of another artist.”

For archivists, faxes are notoriously problematic, being highly unstable, prone to darkening or fading, sensitive to light and temperature, and subject to considerable loss of image data. Soon, if not already, the surfaces of the fax works of Shanghai Fax will be blank. Archival records of the exhibition will then rely heavily on secondary material: a few photographs of the original show; limited documentation from a reshowing of the degraded faxed works at ShanghART gallery in 2011; the original catalogue, though most copies seem to have vanished; and this Re-print.

A fax is of course itself a reprint, the telephonic transmission of a bitmap-encoded scan of an original document. But rather than producing an exact replication, a faxed work is always marked by the mechanical and electronic transfer processes of its transit: scanlines, noise artifacts, blurring, smears, perspectival distortions, the conversion of discrete sheets of paper into elongated strips of imagery, and the addition of heterogeneous time/date/sender/receiver stamps.  Indeed, the narrative of Shanghai Fax, from the original works through to this publication, could be recounted by tracing the actions and mutations of successive reprints (faxing, photographing, re-faxing, pasting, photocopying, re-photographing, scanning, photoshop, digital pdf, offset printing).  The design of this Re-print, at 1:1 scale but sitting within a larger page, allows it to function as an index to the iterative processes of artistic exchange, intervention, distortion, mutation, de-materialisation, re-materialisation and discursive revisiting, that have attended Shanghai Fax.

To assert the significance of Shanghai Fax within contemporary and historical narratives, Re-print #2: Shanghai Fax (1996) “Let’s Talk About Money” will be distributed to targeted galleries, bookstores and libraries, and will be systematically lodged in relevant archives: as legal depository within federal and state library archives in Australia; in archives pertaining to exhibitionmaking in Asia; and in archives of artist publications in North America and Europe.

 

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