Texte Zur Kunst #90

Under the motto “How we aim to work,” the June issue of Texte zur Kunst brings together contributions by authors who have been associated with the magazine for a long time and who have shaped its debates along the way. Instead of specifying a thematic focus, we left it to the contributors to decide which questions relating to their current research interests they wanted to address—themes for which, faced with the deadlines always bearing down on them, the authors usually don’t find time. It is precisely the conditions out of which their texts developed and the different formats of these contributions—from collaborative authorship; to narrative, literary essays; all the way to monographic and performative, artistic treatises—that stand for a different approach to the fields of university research, project-oriented collaborations, or artistic dealings. Such an approach would run counter to the often sobering coercion of activity and effectiveness that characterizes working conditions today. All of the contributions show that a strategy of countering this imperative of activity can derive from pursuing long-term modes of working and thought in a targeted way and from investing in a project intensively over a longer period of time. Not only does the longstanding commitment of these authors to Texte zur Kunst mark such an endeavor, but with their “work samples” in this issue, they also grant us insight into the themes they are currently working on: Instead of bowing to the pressure of presenting only finished products, they stress the potential that lies in making work processes visible and putting them up for debate. “How we aim to work” can therefore be understood as both a question that we pose ourselves and as a public appeal.

Plus a picture spread by Dierk Schmidt and reviews from Berlin, Cincinnati, Cologne, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt/Main, Liverpool, Los Angeles, Madrid, Margate (GB), New York, Nuremberg, Oberhausen, and Paris.

Exclusive new artists’ editions by Matias Faldbakken and Wade Guyton.
English Content


Main Section

Tom Holert
Postscript on the Societies of Comfort 

Jutta Koether
Starting from the Picture
Seat of Power—A Picture of Being a Woman Artist

Beate Söntgen
Why Diderot?
A Project Outline

Helmut Draxler
Taking Part in the Other
Politics and Structural Ambivalence

Sabeth Buchmann & Constanze Ruhm
Subject Put to the Test

Rainer Bellenbaum
Disco, Drift, Tent, Choir
On Elizabeth Price’s Videos

Sven Lütticken
Research Objectives
Or: The Art of Obstruction

Clemens Krümmel
A Minor Ninth That Nobody Wants
On the Henry Flynt Exhibitions “Activities 1959–” in Düsseldorf and Karlsruhe

Short Cuts

Still One of Us?
Isabelle Graw asks Julia Gelshorn, Sebastian Egenhofer, Fiona McGovern, and Chris Reitz about the current reception of Martin Kippenberger.


Christodoulos Panayiotou
Closer Distances
On Disabled Theater by Jérôme Bel

Marina Vishmidt
A Rapid Inventory of the Universe
On Rosa Barba at Turner Contemporary, Margate

Philipp Ekardt
Makeup Collage
On Linder at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris

Adrienne Rooney
Who Knows Nothing?
On John Finneran at Canal 47, New York

Alex Kitnick
Pop Pyramid
On Derek Boshier at Thomas Solomon Gallery, Los Angeles

David Reisman
On Thomas Bayrle at The Artist’s Institute, New York

André Rottmann
Complicity and Contestation
On Andrea Fraser at the Museum Ludwig, Cologne

Petra Lange-Berndt
Unmaking Normality
On “Glam! The Performance of Style” at Tate Liverpool

Michael Darling
On James Welling at the Cincinnati Art Museum

Pedro de Llano
The Sentient Memory of Latin America
On “Losing the human form” at Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid

Artists’ Editions

Matias Faldbakken
Jerry Can Cut, 2013

Wade Guyton
IMG_1919.JPG, 2013


Texte Zur Kunst #90
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