Matt Hinkley

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20/200
Sarah Cottier Gallery 1994 – 2014

The history of Sarah Cottier Gallery’s first twenty years in a comprehensive reference volume.

An example of one of Australia’s most influential contemporary art galleries.

Twenty years, two hundred exhibitions, four venues, nearly one hundred artists. Ever since its arrival in 1994, Sarah Cottier Gallery has been one of Australia’s most courageous contemporary art galleries. The artists represented in this time, including John Armleder, Sydney Ball, Marco Fusinato, Matthys Gerber, John Nixon, Mike Parr, Koji Ryui and Gemma Smith, represent some of the hottest talent in contemporary art.

20/200 celebrates the first twenty years of the gallery and its artists in a pictorial format that illustrates the breadth of the twenty year experience. The book includes images of every one of the gallery’s two hundred exhibitions and includes the work of almost one hundred artists. The volume is hardcover bound with a timeless rounded spine and features a holographic foil on the the front cover. The individual works and specific highlights inevitably surrender to the vast, hypnotic rhythm of the volume’s breadth – as in the fairy tale conundrum of the dancing princesses, each is more beautiful than the last.

Includes the work of A.D.S. Donaldson, Martin Creed, Kerrie Poliness, Melinda Harper, Julian Dashper, John Armleder, Sydney Ball, Mikala Dwyer, Hany Armanious, Marco Fusinato, Matthys Gerber, John Nixon, Mike Parr, Koji Ryui, Mikala Dwyer, Hany Armanious, Matt Hinkley, Huseyin Sami, Robert Pulie, Julia Gorman, Simon Denny, Anne-Marie May, Gemma Smith, John Spiteri, Katherina Grosse, Mary Teague, Olivier Mosset, and many more!

Texts by Nicholas Chambers, Jason Marcou, Julie Fragar, Anna Waldmann, Amanda Rowell,  Alan Cholodenko, Mark Titmarsh and Christopher Hanrahan.

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Technologism


Catalogue published to accompany the exhibition Technologism, at Monash University Museum of Art (MUMA) in Melbourne, 3 Oct – 12 Dec 2015, curated by Charlotte Day.

Artists: Cory Arcangel (US), Dara Birnbaum (US), Chris Burden (US), Ian Burns (AU), Antoinette J. Citizen (AU), Simon Denny (NZ), Jan Dibbets (NL), Aleksandra Domanović (SI/DE), Harun Farocki (DE), Benjamin Forster (AU), Isa Genzken (DE), Greatest Hits (AU), Martijn Hendriks (NL), Lynn Hershman Leeson (US), Matt Hinkley (AU), Jenny Holzer (US), Edward Kienholz & Nancy Reddin Kienholz (US), Oliver Laric (AT), Mark Leckey (UK), Scott Mitchell (AU), Rabih Mroué (LB), Henrik Olesen (DK), Nam June Paik (KR/US), Nam June Paik & John Godfrey (US), Joshua Petherick (AU), Matte Rochford (AU), Jill Scott (AU), Richard Serra (US), John F. Simon Jr. (US), Brian Springer (US), Hito Steyerl (DE), Ricky Swallow (AU), Jeff Thompson (US), Pia van Gelder (AU), Ulla Wiggen (US) and Dennis Wilcox (AU)

MUMA concludes its three-part series on watershed moments in art history — Reinventing the Wheel: the readymade century and Art as a Verb — with Technologism, a major group exhibition bringing together forty-three historical and contemporary artworks, including several new commissions from Australian practitioners. Technologism wrestles with the profound cultural, social and political impact technology has made on art since the 1960s.

Conservative cul-de-sac’s of the community are often sceptical of technology and its ever increasing presence in our lives. However many artists — with a natural propensity for constant upheaval — have whole-heartedly embraced radical changes in technology over the last sixty years. Featuring artworks that engage both physically and conceptually with electronic systems — television, computers, the internet, smartphones — Technologism focuses on the ways artists critique and disrupt official uses of the media, or construct their own machines and data systems.

Riffing off both the aesthetic and conceptual characteristics of technology, artists in Technologism document technology’s advancement in a plethora of ways: Ulla Wiggen’s intricate paintings of circuit boards from the mid 1960s, see the development of an aesthetic inspired by the complex intersection of electrical wires, connectors and components, working to manipulate and rewire the physicality of technology; some thirty years later, John F. Simon’s Art Appliances series of the 1990s uses the circuitry of small LCD screens to disrupt pictures and patterns, recreating them over; in Matte Rochford’s video Progressively Degrading Test Pattern 2013, humble VHS tapes are copied and recopied, in a process of metaphysical reduction; while in Joshua Petherick’s new work, one technology is employed to record another soon to be superseded, revealing new visual dimensions and the ‘ghosts in the machine’.

A story of advancement inevitably turns into obsolescence, and Technologism seeks to document the early use of broadcast technology as a way of bridging the gap (and finding a space) between the image on the screen, the physical presence of the viewer, and the broader community. Jan Dibbet’s TV as a Fireplace 1968, documents television as a collective experience — even if viewers were separated physically, they were united through time and space like pre-historic cave-dwellers by a communal broadcast. However with the advent of the internet, personal computer devices and streaming services, technology has again changed the relationship we have with the world around us to a more singular yet proliferating existence.

A history of DIY jamming and hacking presents the way artists have continued to subvert conventional uses of technology and challenge the status-quo, from the internet as militarily-designed, to corporately-exploited, civilian-employed, artistically-manipulated, and back again. For instance, Lynn Hershman Leeson’s work investigates how media is used as a tool for censorship and political repression, while Simon Denny’s work co-opts the aesthetic and rhetoric of language of multinational corporations in order to question their power. In presenting these works and others, Technologism seeks to consider what is the value of such subversion, or is it merely a perpetuation of the problem?

Artist Hito Steyerl asks, ‘is the internet dead?’ Although, hyperbolic in its prognosis, Technologism recognises that sceptical questions such as this are an important part of how artistic practice negotiates technological advancement. Technologism proceeds from the idea that technology in all its forms, physical and immaterial, needs to be interrogated in order to be perpetually remade.

Technologism considers changes in infrastructure, such as telecommunication networks and the internet, and the cultural implications of technological innovation and considers from the position of the developers of these technologies as well as from the end user. Technologism asks ‘how does technology effect artistic practice?’ As well as, ‘how can artistic practice effect technology?’

Fully illustrated catalogue features texts by Charlotte Day, Philip Brophy, Bridget Crone and Sean Dockray. Designed by Yanni Florence.

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THE LULENNIAL: A SLIGHT GESTUARY

Fabiola Iza, Chris Sharp, eds.

Economy, “in the sense of doing a lot with a little or sometimes nothing at all,” is one of the founding principles of the Lulennial, a biennial organized by Fabiola Iza and Chris Sharp at Lulu, a 9-square meter independent space in Mexico City. The diminutive space is not necessarily a constraint if the works exhibited (and featured in this accompanying publication) are the startling outcome of slight gestures, like those created by Jirí Kovanda, Roman Ondák, Kirsten Pieroth, Wilfredo Prieto, and Martín Soto Climent, just to name some of the more than 25 participants in the exhibition. Other instigators of this peculiar attitude, the purpose of which is to achieve the maximum effect through the smallest of means, range from Billy Apple to Graciela Carnevale to Mierle Laderman Ukeles and La Monte Young, among others.

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Reinventing The Wheel: The Readymade Century

Publication to accompany the exhibition “Reinventing The Wheel: The Readymade Century”, 3 October – 14 December 2013, Monash University Museum of Art, Victoria, Australia.

Arguably the most influential development in art of the twentieth century, the use of the readymade was set in motion 100 years ago with Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel. Giving birth to an entire artistic language, Duchamp’s conversion of an unadorned, everyday object into a figure of high art completely inverted how people considered artistic practice. Suddenly, art was capable of being everywhere and in everything. It was a revolutionary moment in modern art, and the ripples from this epochal shift still resonate today.

Reinventing the Wheel: the Readymade Century pays tribute to this seminal work and traces the subsequent elaboration of neo-dada practices, with a particular focus upon everyday and vernacular contexts; the mysterious and libidinous potential of sculptural objects; institutional critique and nominal modes of artistic value; pop, minimalism and industrial manufacture. These discursive contexts will also provide a foundation to explore more recent tendencies related to unmonumental and social sculpture, post-fordism and other concerns, particularly among contemporary Australian artists.

Bringing together works by over 50 artists – from Duchamp and Man Ray to Andy Warhol and Martin Creed, along with some of Australia’s leading practitioners – this is a one-of-a-kind salute to an idea that continues to define the very nature of contemporary art.

Artists:

Carl Andre, Hany Armanious, Nairy Baghramian, Ian Burn, John Cage, Christo & Jeanne-Claude,  Tony Cragg, Michael Craig-Martin, Martin Creed, Aleks Danko, Julian Dashper, Simon Denny, Marcel Duchamp, Sylvie Fleury, Ceal Floyer, Claire Fontaine, Gilbert & George, Félix González-Torres, Agatha Gothe-Snape, Greatest Hits, Matthew Griffin, Richard Hamilton, David Hammons, Matt Hinkley, Lou Hubbard, Barry Humphries, Jeff Koons, Joseph Kosuth, Louise Lawler, Klara Lidén, Andrew Liversidge, James Lynch, Robert MacPherson, Rob McKenzie, Callum Morton, John Nixon, Meret Oppenheim, Joshua Petherick, Kain Picken, Rosslynd Piggott, Man Ray, Scott Redford, Stuart Ringholt, Peter Saville, Charlie Sofo, Haim Steinbach, Ricky Swallow, Masato Takasaka, Peter Tyndall, Alex Vivian, Danh Vo, Andy Warhol, and Heimo Zobernig.

Curatorial team:
Max Delany (former MUMA director), Charlotte Day, Francis E. Parker, and Patrice Sharkey.With texts by Rex Butler, Charlotte Day, Francis Parker, Patrice Sharkey, and a never before published text by Thierry de Duve.
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